Week 12 - Persuading Audiences

Week 12 - Persuading Audiences - Week12 Unit4Persuading...

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    Week 12   Unit 4 - Persuading  Audiences 
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    Ways to persuade audiences Informing Convincing Arguing Persuading What are the differences? 
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    How can “informing” be a  persuasive act?  These elements of your explanations are  themselves persuasive: Clarity, presentation, and organization of  your information  Quality of your information Quantity of your information Sources you choose 
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    For example,  If you ask someone on Charles Street for  directions to Camden Yards, and the person  spends five minutes confusing you with  directions, and then you discover this person is  a tourist from France whose aunt, who visited  Baltimore six years ago, gave him these  directions, I don’t think his explanation would be  very persuasive.  
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    Convincing vs. persuading What’s the difference?  Convincing is more of an intellectual or cognitive act. When you  convince someone, you’ve helped that person change his or  her mind about a topic.  Persuading includes the act of convincing, but it pushes beyond  simply changing someone’s mind. When you persuade  someone, you both change that person’s mind and  subsequently persuade him or her to do something about that  change such as modify behavior, vote for a candidate,  purchase a product, etc.  
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    Arguing vs. persuading What’s the difference?  Essentially, these acts are the same. However,  “arguing” sometimes carries negative connotations,  while “persuading” sometimes carries positive  connotations.   For example, in your workplace, do you want to be  perceived as an arguer or a persuader? 
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    Arguing in cultural contexts Different cultures perceive arguments in  different ways.  In America, where democracy and free speech  are valued, we expect citizens to debate and  argue.  However, in some cultures, arguing could easily  be perceived as a sign of disrespect. 
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    Types of statements used in  persuasion  Claims Beliefs Assumptions Facts Opinions 
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    Claims Claims demand support and evidence.  Thesis statements are claims.  Three general types of claims include… Claims about a present reality The college chemistry laboratory needs new equipment.  Claims about values, ethics, or fairness The university’s tuition hike is unjustified since many administrators  recently received raises.   Claims recommending a course of action The university can relieve pressure on its parking facilities by  offering financial incentives for students and employees to car pool  to campus.  
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  Claims  The claims in the previous slide all 
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Week 12 - Persuading Audiences - Week12 Unit4Persuading...

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