chapter6 - Chapter 6 Understanding and Assessing Hardware:...

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CIS1000DE Chapter 6 Understanding and Assessing Hardware: Evaluating Your System
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CIS1000DE 2 Chapter Topics To buy or upgrade? Evaluating your system: CPU RAM Storage devices Video output Sound systems Computer ports System reliability
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CIS1000DE 3 To Buy or To Upgrade? Things to consider: Moore’s Law Cost of upgrading vs. buying Time installing software and files Needs and wants
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CIS1000DE A rule of thumb often cited in the computer industry, called Moore’s Law, describes the pace at which CPUs improve. This mathematical rule, named after Gordon Moore, the cofounder of the CPU chip manufacturer Intel, predicts that the number of transistors inside a CPU will increase so fast that CPU capacity will double every 18 months. (The number of transistors on a CPU chip helps determine how fast it can process data.) This rule of thumb has held true since1965, when Moore first published his theory . In addition to the CPU becoming faster, other system components also improve dramatically. For example, the capacity of memory chips such as DRAM—the most common form of memory found on PCs—increases about 60 percent every year. When deciding whether to upgrade or buy new, consider the costs involved, the time it would take to transfer all of your files and to reinstall and reconfigure your software, as well as your needs and wants.
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CIS1000DE 5 Assessing Your Hardware: Evaluating Your System Assess the computer’s subsystems The subsystems include CPU RAM Storage devices Video Audio Ports To determine whether your computer system has the right hardware components to do what you want it to do, you need to conduct a system evaluation . To do so, you look at your computer’s subsystems, what they do, and how they perform: CPU; RAM; The storage subsystem (your hard drive and other drives); The video subsystem (your video card and monitor); The audio subsystem (your sound card and speakers); Your computer’s ports
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CIS1000DE 6 Desktop or Notebook Desktop Hard to move around Less expensive Harder to steal Easier to upgrade Difficult to ship (repairs) Notebook Portable More expensive Easily stolen Difficult to upgrade Prone to damage Notebook computers are more expensive than similarly equipped desktops. Notebook computers are more easily stolen and are more difficult to upgrade. They are also prone to damage from being dropped. Desktop computers are easier to upgrade, but difficult to ship if needed.
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CIS1000DE 7 Evaluating the CPU How does the CPU work? Control unit Arithmetic logic unit (ALU) Machine cycle: Fetch Decode Execute Store Speed: MHz GHz
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CIS1000DE In addition to pure processing speed, CPU performance also is affected by the speed of the front side bus (or FSB ) and the amount of cache memory . The FSB connects the processor (CPU) in your computer to the system memory. The faster the FSB is, the faster you can get data to your processor. FSB speed is measured in Megahertz (MHz). Cache memory is
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This note was uploaded on 09/23/2010 for the course CS 001 taught by Professor Jix during the Spring '10 term at Riverside Community College.

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chapter6 - Chapter 6 Understanding and Assessing Hardware:...

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