chapter13 - Chapter 13 Behind the Scenes: The Internet: How...

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CIS1000DE Chapter 13 Behind the Scenes: The Internet: How It Works
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CIS1000DE 2 Chapter Topics Managing the Internet Interaction between Internet components Internet data transmission and protocols IP addresses and domain names FTP and Telnet HTML and XLM How e-mail and instant messaging work and how to keep them secure
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CIS1000DE 3 Management of the Internet Who owns the Internet? Individuals Universities Government agencies Private companies Who manages the Internet? Nonprofit organizations User groups Who pays for the Internet? U.S. taxpayers Businesses Universities Other countries
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CIS1000DE Although the U.S. government funded the development of the technologies that spawned the Internet, no one really owns it. The individual local networks that constitute the Internet are all owned by different individuals, universities, government agencies, and private companies. Many government entities and privately held companies own pieces of the communications infrastructure that makes the Internet work. A number of nonprofit organizations and user groups, each with a specialized purpose, are responsible for managing the Internet. The U.S. government pays for a large portion of the Internet infrastructure as well as funds research and development for new technologies. The primary source of these funds is your tax dollars. Originally, U.S. taxpayers footed the entire bill for the Internet, but as the Internet grew and organizations were formed to manage it, businesses, universities, and other countries began paying for Internet infrastructure and development.
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CIS1000DE 5 Connecting Internet Service Providers Internet backbone Collection of large national and international networks T lines High-speed fiber-optic communications lines designed to provide high throughput T-1 lines T-2 lines T-3 lines T-4 lines
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CIS1000DE The main paths of the Internet along which data travels the fastest are known collectively as the Internet backbone. The backbone is a collection of large national and international networks, which are usually owned by commercial, educational, or government (such as NASA) organizations. These backbone providers are required to be connected with other backbone providers and have the fastest high-speed connections. Some large companies that provide backbone Sprint Nextel, and Qwest. Most high-speed communications between ISPs are achieved using T lines. Today, T lines are mostly high-speed fiber-optic communications lines that are designed to provide much higher throughput than conventional voice (telephone) and data (DSL) lines. T lines come in a variety of speeds.
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CIS1000DE 7 Network Access Points (NAPs) Points of connection between ISPs Once known as network access points (NAPs) Private sector companies make up the Internet system
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This note was uploaded on 09/23/2010 for the course CS 001 taught by Professor Jix during the Spring '10 term at Riverside Community College.

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chapter13 - Chapter 13 Behind the Scenes: The Internet: How...

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