104A - CN05 - Review 1

104A - CN05 - Review 1 - 104A CN05 Revision 1 Revision...

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104A CN05 Revision 1 Revision Begins with Recognition Administrative d 12s due on Wednesday at 7:00 PM 0 Chat Room therefore on Tuesday, from 8:00 PM – 9:00 PM Administrative d When I assign a grade to a student’s writing assignment, I evaluate that assignment both as a response to the prompt (“Did the assignment do what the prompt asked?”) and on the quality of the writing. The latter… 0 “Please change here and elsewhere” indicates that I’ve recognized the same opportunity elsewhere. 0 No student, under any circumstances, is to go outside the university for help in writing an assignment or in revising it. o Why my comments appear in light gray rather than black. 0 Office hours are your hours, including Chat Room tomorrow night, from 8:00 PM – 9:00 PM. Review “Document a source if… 0 You quote the passage verbatim 0 You paraphrase the passage 0 You summarize the passage 0 You include information not generally known 0 You borrow someone else’s [belief]”* *Source: Crews, Frederick, The Random House Handbook, 6/e h Appositive phrases New for Today: Revision Begins with Recognition
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“Revision” means “to see again,” or “to re-imagine.” But writers must be able to recognize opportunities to revise before they can revise – that is, act on those opportunities. Revision begins with recognition. o How I choose anonymous student examples: representative, not worst. 0 These Class Notes may look random; they’re anything but. 0 If you see on your 11 “Please change here and elsewhere,” then the same opportunity arises elsewhere at least once in your draft, and you should learn to recognize it and correct it there, too. 0 Writers must use quotation marks whenever they quote directly. 0 A noun phrase works very well as the “title” of a memo. A noun phrase works poorly as the subject of a sentence. Revise when you discover that you’ve composed a draft sentence with one as its subject . Here are three examples from student 11s of noun phrases
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This note was uploaded on 09/25/2010 for the course UWP 54876 taught by Professor Godre during the Spring '10 term at UC Davis.

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104A - CN05 - Review 1 - 104A CN05 Revision 1 Revision...

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