ES 188 Notes

ES 188 Notes - ES188EnvironmentalEthics 25/10/200918:23:00...

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ES 188 - Environmental Ethics 25/10/2009 18:23:00 Week 1 Social Contract - Social contract describes a broad class of theories that try to explain the ways in which people form states and/or maintain social order Aspects of our social contract: o freedom o Rights - Egalitarianism has two distinct definitions in modern English. [1] It is defined either as a political doctrine that holds that all people should be treated as equals and have the same political , economic , social , and civil rights [2] or as a social philosophy advocating the removal of economic inequalities among people .   Egalitarianism asserts that all people are of equal value and should be treated the same irrespective of their birth. o o
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ES 188 - Notes 25/10/2009 18:23:00 Key Terms Natural Values Intrisic Value Theory Technocentric Ecocentric New Ecological Paradigm Karl Popper Dialectical Model Scientific Revolution Aldo Leopolds Land Ethic Egalitarianism (derived from the French word égal , meaning "equal"), has two distinct definitions in modern English. [1] It is defined either as a political doctrine that holds that all people should be treated as equals and have the same political , economic , social , and civil rights [2] or as a social philosophy advocating the removal of economic inequalities among people . In modern cultures, peoples tend to be divided into upper or lower classes. However, before the relatively recent agricultural revolution , humanity existed in primarily hunter-gatherer societies, which tended to be egalitarian. It is considered by some [ by whom? ] to be the natural state of society. [3] [4] [5] Civil society is composed of the totality of voluntary civic and social organizations and institutions that form the basis of a functioning society as opposed to the force-backed structures of a state (regardless of that state's political system) and commercial institutions of the market . par·a·digm \One that serves as a pattern or model. A set or list of all the inflectional forms of a word or of one of its grammatical categories: the paradigm of an irregular verb. A set of assumptions, concepts, values, and practices that constitutes a way of viewing reality for the community that shares them, especially in an intellectual discipline.
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Environmental Identity 1. Thinking specifically about the environmental movement, do you think of yourself as—an active participant in the environmental movement; sympathetic towards the movement, but not active; neutral; or unsympathetic towards the environmental movement? Source: Dunlap, Riley E., and Aaron M. McCright. “Social Movement Identity: Validating a Measure of Identification with the Environmental Movement.” Social Science Quarterly 89 (2008): 1045-65. New Ecological Paradigm
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This note was uploaded on 09/23/2010 for the course ES 188 taught by Professor Mcginnis during the Fall '09 term at UCSB.

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ES 188 Notes - ES188EnvironmentalEthics 25/10/200918:23:00...

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