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lecture34 - 6.720J/3.43J Integrated Microelectronic Devices...

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6.720J/3.43J - Integrated Microelectronic Devices - Spring 2007 Lecture 34-1 Lecture 34 - Bipolar Junction Transistor May 2, 2007 Contents: 1. The ideal BJT 2. Current-voltage characteristics of ideal BJT Reading material: del Alamo, Ch. 11, §§ 11.1, 11.2 (11.2.1) Cite as: Jesús del Alamo, course materials for 6.720J Integrated Microelectronic Devices, Spring 2007. MIT OpenCourseWare (http://ocw.mit.edu/), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Downloaded on [DD Month YYYY].
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6.720J/3.43J - Integrated Microelectronic Devices - Spring 2007 Lecture 34-2 Key questions How does a bipolar junction transistor look like? How does a BJT basically work? Can we derive a first order model for I C and I B in forward-active regime? Cite as: Jesús del Alamo, course materials for 6.720J Integrated Microelectronic Devices, Spring 2007. MIT OpenCourseWare (http://ocw.mit.edu/), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Downloaded on [DD Month YYYY].
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6.720J/3.43J - Integrated Microelectronic Devices - Spring 2007 Lecture 34-3 1. The ideal BJT Modern BJT: ± base � emitter� base � collector� contact contact contact contact n + emitter p base n collector n + buried layer n + plug p substrate "intrinsic" BJT base-collector junction base-emitter junction (area A E ) emitter-stripe length collector-substrate junction emitter-stripe width Cite as: Jesús del Alamo, course materials for 6.720J Integrated Microelectronic Devices, Spring 2007. MIT OpenCourseWare (http://ocw.mit.edu/), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Downloaded on [DD Month YYYY].
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6.720J/3.43J - Integrated Microelectronic Devices - Spring 2007 Lecture 34-4 BJT basically consists of two neighbouring pn junctions back-to­ back: close enough that minority carriers interact (negligible recombi­ nation in base) far apart enough that depletion regions don’t interact± (no ”punchthrough”)± Uniqueness of BJT: high current drivability per input capacitance fast excellent for analog and front-end communications applica­ tions. Cite as: Jesús del Alamo, course materials for 6.720J Integrated Microelectronic Devices, Spring 2007. MIT OpenCourseWare (http://ocw.mit.edu/), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Downloaded on [DD Month YYYY].
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6.720J/3.43J - Integrated Microelectronic Devices - Spring 2007 Lecture 34-5 Ideal BJT: base emitter� base contact contact contact extrinsic regions collector contact A E A C intrinsic� region n + p p n n Ideal BJT simplifications: 1D. Uniform doping distributions.
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