September 11

September 11 - Infrared satellite loop measures heat infrared wave links transmit heat how cold or warm the clouds are the higher the clouds in the

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September 11, 2009 Infrared satellite loop- measures heat- infrared wave links transmit heat how cold or warm the clouds are. the higher the clouds in the atmosphere, the colder yellow and red represented very cold temperatures (healthy storm) very deep clouds that extend well up into the atmosphere (up 16 km) life cycles: organization of the storms and how long it takes to traverse the ocean: when a storm first developed, the first thing that is recognized is a tropical depression (the pressure is lower at the center of the storm than around the storm).- banding structure, see higher clouds, convection- cottony. when the winds are blowing between 20-34 knots, 37 km/h, a depression is recognized how can you tell the strength the winds are blowing? is there a way to directly measure it? we can use satellite pictures to trace cloud motions to see how quickly the clouds are moving. and based on that, we are able to tell how strong the winds are. once the storm is more organized. once you get to tropical storm strength- they name the storm. why do they give storms a name? a lot easier for people to keep track of. the names of the storms are different depending what basin you're in. the names of the storm go with the culture of where the storm is. they started using male names in 1979. before that, it was exclusively woman's names. once storm is really well organized, an eye start to develop. you notice how circular is. before its a circle, it's sort of like a comma. once the storm develops an eye, its almost at least hurricane strength. its rare to see something as a tropical storm intensity with an eye. 75 moh, 120 kph most intense wind speeds = 200 mph, 350kph - when ike went over cuba, we set the record for the strongest measured wind- 347-367kph Saffir/simpson hurricane scale: 1- winds 74-95 mph 2- winds 96-110 mph 3- winds 111-130 mph 4- winds 131-155 mph 5- winds greater than 155 mph (sustained winds- must be the average speed measured for at least a minute) how long they take to get across the ocean? they move 10-14 mph
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around a week problem: when storms get to the US, they curve to the north, the rate of motion increases because the hurricane starts interacting with the mid-latitude features (cold fronts, warm fronts) stronger winds over north america. they start to speed. in general, you have at least a week. the only way to get surprised, is how strong
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This note was uploaded on 09/24/2010 for the course ARTS NDIS235 taught by Professor Schwarts during the Fall '09 term at McGill.

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September 11 - Infrared satellite loop measures heat infrared wave links transmit heat how cold or warm the clouds are the higher the clouds in the

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