PHI 105 Week 8-Checkpoint - Final Project Outline and Speaker’s Notes

PHI 105 Week 8-Checkpoint - Final Project Outline and Speaker’s Notes

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Final Project Outline and Speaker’s Notes CheckPoint Final Project Topic: When one selects a particular professional life, does that also give ne a certain set of moral obligations? I. Title – Moral Obligations: Social Services Profession II. Introduction 1. Moral Obligations 2. Social Services Profession Duty to others Competence Integrity III. Duty to others 1. Service 2. Pro-bono Work IV. Competence 1. Education 2. Cultural and Social Diversity V. Integrity 1. Professional Behaviors Ethics Honesty and Reliability VI. My Thoughts - Duty to Others 1. Importance of Duty to Self 2. Obligation VII. My Thoughts - Competence 1. Self 2. Character Traits 3. Knowledge VIII. My Thoughts – Integrity 1. Honor 2. Responsibility VIIII. Jean-Paul Sartre (1905 – 1980)
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1. Self and Morality 2. Actions and Morality 3. Choosing for Self and Others X. Mark Halfon 1. Integrity as Moral Purpose XI. Aristotle (384 - 322 B.C.E.) 1. Knowledge and Logic 2. Competence XII. Conclusion 1. Moral Obligations Duty to Self/Duty to Others Traits and Experience Knowledge XIII. References Halfon, M. (1989). Integrity: A Philosophical Inquiry . Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved June 25, 2009, from http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/integrity/ Moore, B. N., & Bruder, K. (2008). Philosophy: The Power of Ideas (7th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.
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Speaker’s Notes Slide 1 – Title: Slide 2 – Introduction: The moral obligations mentioned and discussed in this presentation are only a few of many. Duty to others, integrity, and competence are considered to be the main principles within the social service profession. Many social service issues arise because some workers do not always practice the strict code of ethics and moral obligations that are vital in the social service profession. Although these principles will be listed individually, they are all related and depend upon each other to achieve a well-rounded and competent social service system. Slide 3 – Duty to Others:
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This note was uploaded on 09/25/2010 for the course PHI105 PHI105 taught by Professor Richardpowell during the Fall '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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PHI 105 Week 8-Checkpoint - Final Project Outline and Speaker’s Notes

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