Movements of the Shoulder Girdle

Movements of the Shoulder Girdle - 2. Upward Tilt - turning...

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Movements of the Shoulder Girdle Important to stress that the shoulder girdle movements occur at both joints – acromioclavicular and sternoclavicular o even though description of the movements stress the action of the scapula 1. Elevation: o scapula rises o this is a movement in the frontal plane o occurs to a slight extent during elevation of the humerus o occurs to a great extent during hunching of shoulders 1. Depression o This is a frontal plane return to the anatomical position from elevation. o Generally none occurs below the anatomical position 1. Protraction - abduction of scapula o as scapula abducts it turns about its vertical axis in a transverse plane action known as lateral tilt forward movement of axillary border combined with backward movement of vertebral border o it is usually combined with upward rotation 1. Retraction - adduction of scapula – return from protraction
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Unformatted text preview: 2. Upward Tilt - turning on a frontal axis in the sagittal plane o accompanied by rotation of the clavicle o occurs only in conjunction with hyper-extension of the humerus 6. Reduction of Upward Tilt return from upward tilt 7. Upward Rotation o in the frontal plane around the sagittal axis o occurs largely at acromioclavicular joint o this is a significant part of the scapulo-humeral rhythm (with elevation of humerus) o serves three purposes puts glenoid fossa in a good position for upper extremity movement contributes significantly to stability of shoulder by putting the glenoid fossa beneath the larger head of the humerus moves the origin of the deltoid medially while it is elevating the humerus this maintains a more favorable length-tension relationship prevents it from shortening too much...
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Movements of the Shoulder Girdle - 2. Upward Tilt - turning...

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