Teotihuacan

Teotihuacan - FFigure Figure 3: PyramidFeathered Serpent...

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Figure 1(richard-seaman.com): Avenue of the Dead Figure 2: Temple of the Feathered Serpent Figure 2: Temple of the Feathered Serpent Figure 3: Pyramid of the Sun Figure 6: Possible building technique Teotihuacan Mexico City, Mexico Quinton Candelaria April 29, 2008 CON101 Kraig Knutson I hereby certify that the contents contained within are my original work and have in no way been influenced by outside works other than my own personal research.
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Candelaria 2 Abstract Teotihuacan was an ancient city that contained a highly advanced civilization which lasted from 250 B.C. to 700 A.D. The true history of Teotihuacan is considered a mystery but the colossal structures reveal the true power and size of the ancient city. During its time period many massive and extraordinary buildings were made, including the Pyramid of the Sun which is currently the third largest pyramid in the world. The history and attraction that the edifices and ruins left behind truly show how an ancient civilization could accomplish near-impossible tasks and create a monuments that will last for an eternity.
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Candelaria 3 The ancient city and ruins of Teotihuacan, located in the highlands of central Mexico, is one of the world's most impressive archaeological sites. Teotihuacan, the name of the magnificent and dramatic urban center about twenty-five miles north-east of modern day Mexico City, has been variously translated from the Nahua language of the Aztec people as “the dwelling place of the gods” and “the place where men become gods”( Matos, pg 9). The early history of city of Teotihuacan is quite mysterious, and is still questioned among historians today. In the Late Formative period, a number of urban centers arose in central Mexico. The most prominent of these appears to have been Cuicuilco, on the southern shore of Lake Texcoco. Scholars have speculated that the eruption of the Xitle volcano may have prompted a mass emigration out of the central valley and into the Teotihuacan valley. These settlers may have founded and/or accelerated the growth of Teotihuacan. Other scholars have put forth the Totonac people as the founders of Teotihuacan. There is evidence that at least some of the people living in Teotihuacan came from areas influenced by the Teotihuacano civilization, including the Zapotec, Mixtec and Maya peoples. The culture and architecture of Teotihuacan was influenced by the Olmec people, who are considered to be the "mother civilization" of Mesoamerica (Wapedia).
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Candelaria 4 One of the most memorable and surprising aspects of Teotihuacan are the numerous buildings. The first structure completed in Teotihuacan was the Avenue of Dead. It was given its name because it was thought that bodies were buried along the sides of the road. However, it turned out that the six mile long road lead to many temples where sacrificial ceremonies took place. This road, besides from being six miles long, was the center point and main avenue of transportation for the city. It starts near the market and temple of the feathered serpent at the
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2010 for the course CON 14272 taught by Professor Knutson during the Spring '10 term at ASU.

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Teotihuacan - FFigure Figure 3: PyramidFeathered Serpent...

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