Chapter 14 - C hapter 14 Retailing Retailing T he set of business activities that add value to products and services sold to consumers for their

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Chapter 14 – Retailing Retailing - The set of business activities that add value to products and services sold to consumers for their personal or family use; includes products bought at stores, through catalogues, and over the internet, as well as services such as fast food, airlines and hotels. No longer do manufacturers rule marketing channels, Retail giants such as Wal-Mart, dictate to their suppliers what should be made, how it is to be configured, when it should be delivered and to some extent what it should cost Virtually every penny a consumer spends outside of taxes in done so through retailers. The Changing retail Landscape The Big Middle (14.1) – The Big Middle refers to that part of the market in which the most successful retailers compete because the biggest potential customer base resides there. New retailers often start out with an innovative format, offer a low price advantage or both. Over time the most successful “innovative” and “low price” competitors drift into the big middle Customers become loyal to big middle retailers because they provide them with what they need: good customer service, and excellent loyalty programs Firms get to The Big Middle through innovations in products, formats or operational excellence leading to low prices and great value Must understand their S and W’s, keep an eye on target markets as well as competition and do everything they can to grow and retain a loyal customer base Formally Big Middle was made up of traditional department stores like Eatons but has shifted to low price leaders such as Wal-Mart and Zellers The Wheel of Retailing (14.2) – Generally retailers enter with low prices, low margins and low status. Over time they add more and more services and improvements and are thus able to raise prices, earn higher margins and achieve higher status with consumers. As stores add services and improvements in the mix that consumer’s value, this increases their costs, which result in higher prices. This creates opportunities for new firms to enter.
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How Retailers Create Value - retailers add value by bringing everything together in one location. They have a broad selection of items which can be seen, touched, and tested to a certain extent. You can purchase one item, or multiple items and there are sales associated present to aid in the purchase process and provide information. Value retailers continue to increase their shopability by providing more convenient store layouts, and shopping experiences that make the task faster and easier 4 P’s to Create Value in Retailing Product - Typical retailers can carry anywhere from 30,000 to 200,000 items. Providing the right mix of merchandise and services that satisfies the
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This note was uploaded on 09/26/2010 for the course BU BU352 taught by Professor Stan during the Fall '09 term at Wilfred Laurier University .

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Chapter 14 - C hapter 14 Retailing Retailing T he set of business activities that add value to products and services sold to consumers for their

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