Anatomy & Physiology Nerve and Energy Production Notes

Anatomy & Physiology Nerve and Energy Production...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1. What is the sliding filament theory? The sliding filament theory is as follows. Muscle contraction occurs because myosin heads attach  to and “walk” along the thin filaments at both ends of a sarcomere, progressively pulling the thin  filaments toward the M line. As a result, the thin filaments slide inward and meet at the center of a  sarcomere. They may even more so far inward that their ends overlap. As the thin filaments slide  inward, the Z discs come closer together, and the sarcomere shortens. However, the lengths of  the individual thick and thin filaments do not change. Shortening of the sarcomeres causes  shortening of the whole muscle fiber, which leads to shortening of the entire muscle.  2. What is meant by the term power stroke when used relative to a skeletal muscle  contraction? Power Stroke. The release of the phosphate group triggers the power stroke of contraction.  During the power stroke, the pocket on the myosin head where ADP is still bound opens. As a  result, the myosin head rotates and releases the ADP. The myosin head generates force as it  rotates toward the center of the sarcomere, sliding the thin filament past the thick filament toward  the M line. 3. What makes up a motor unit?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A motor unit consists of a somatic motor neuron plus all the skeletal muscle fibers it stimulates. A  single motor neuron makes contact with an average of 150 muscle fibers and all muscle fibers in  one motor unit contract in unison. Typically, the muscle fibers of a motor unit are dispersed  throughout a muscle rather than clustered together.  4. Be able to explain the ways the muscle cells produce energy.  a. Creatinine Phosphate System While they are relaxed, muscle fibers produce more ATP than they need for resting metabolism.  The excess ATP is used to synthesize creatine phosphate, an energy-rich molecule that is found  only in muscle fibers. The enzyme creatine kinase (CK) catalyzes the transfer of one of the high- energy phosphate groups from ATP to creatine, forming creatine phosphate and ADP. Creatine  phosphate is three to six times more plentiful than ATP in the sarcoplasm of a related muscle  fiber. When contraction begins and the ADP level starts to rise, CK catalyzes the transfer of a  high-energy phosphate back to ADP. This direct phosphorylation reaction quickly forms new ATP  molecules. Together, creatine phosphate and ATP provide enough energy for muscles to contract  maximally for about 15 seconds. This is sufficient for maximal short amounts of energy, which is  good for sprinter runners.  b. Glycolysis During glycolysis, chemical reactions split a 6-carbon molecule of glucose into two 3-carbon 
Background image of page 2
molecules of pyruvic acid. Even though glycolysis consumes 2 ATP molecules, it produces 4 ATP 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 9

Anatomy & Physiology Nerve and Energy Production...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online