week6 - Week 6e 1B Homework Prob. 6-14, 6-53, 6-62 The...

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Week 6e 1B Homework Prob. 6-14, 6-53, 6-62 The application of equilibrium equations in two special cases commonly used in constructions. Chapter6 Structural Analysis Sec.6.1 - Sec.6.4 Forces in the members of a truss – method of joints – method of sections Forces acting on the members of frames and machines 6.1 Simple Trusses A truss is composed of slender members joined together at their end points. The joint connections are formed by (a) bolting or welding the ends of the members to a common plate, (b) passing a large bolt or pin through each of the members. Assumptions for Design 1. All loadings are applied at the joints. 2. The weight of the members is usually neglected. 3. The members are joined together by smooth pins, thus the center lines of the joining members are concurrent. Each truss member is a two-force member. If the force tends to elongate the member, it’s a tensile force (T). If the force tends to shorten the member, it’s a compressive force (C). Compression members must be made thicker then tension members due to the buckling or column effects. If the member’s weight is encountered, it’s generally to apply it as a vertical force, half of its magnitude applied at each end of the member. 6.2 Method of Joints For a free-body diagram of the entire truss, the forces in the members are internal forces. But if we consider the equilibrium of a joint, then a member force becomes an external force. Equilibrium conditions: Fx = 0 and Fy = 0 (for planar trusses) Mo = 0 (why?) The analysis should start at a joint having at least one known force and at most two unknown forces. (why? The forces acting at each joint is coplanar and conccurent ) Procedure for Analysis 1
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1. Draw the free-body diagram of a joint having at least one known force and at most
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This note was uploaded on 09/27/2010 for the course ME 200 taught by Professor Michael during the Spring '10 term at Alamance Community College.

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week6 - Week 6e 1B Homework Prob. 6-14, 6-53, 6-62 The...

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