Lec2 - Wrestling between Safeguard and Attack - An example...

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1 Wrestling between Safeguard and Attack --- An example for security flaws
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2 It is so easy to be flawed in cryptography! Cryptographic algorithms, protocols, and Systems usually contain security flaws. How can we deal with flaws? Fix them. But the fixed versions may again contain flaws. In this lecture, we show an example of attack- fix-attack-fix-…
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3 Preliminaries: Starting from Encryption Encryption Decryption “ Hello, how are you?” 00111010001001 11110100001010 ( Cleartext ) ( Ciphertext ) Encryption key Decryption key
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4 Private Key versus Public Key Private (Symmetric) Key Cryptosystem : Encryption key = Decryption Key Public (Asymmetric) Key Cryptosystem : Encryption Key ≠ Decryption Key Encryption key often called public key ; Decryption key often called private key . Note the difference between private key cryptosystem and private key .
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5 Typical Use of Public Key Cryptosystem Each party has a pair of private/public key. Public key is well-known. Others use this key to encrypt message sent to this party. Private key is only known by this party. This party uses it to decrypt the received messages. All other parties do not know this private key, and thus can’t decrypt this party’s received messages.
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6 Notations for Encryption/Decryption We use A(x) to denote the application of algorithm A to input x. Thus E(k,m) denotes encrypting cleartext m with encryption algorithm E and encryption key k. Similarly, D(k,C) denotes decrypting ciphertext C with decryption algorithm D and encryption key k.
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7 More Notations and Assumptions • For simplicity, we often write {m} k in stead of E(k,m). We assume: Without knowing decryption key , one cannot learn anything about m from {m} k . One cannot learn anything about the decryption key from {m} k (and from k in a public key cryptosystem). Recall the decryption key is k in a private key cryptosystem; and it is the corresponding private key in a public key cryptosystem.
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8 Security Model: Dolev-Yao Besides the preliminary knowledge, we need to know the security model before talking about the example. We use the well-known Dolev-Yao model.
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9 Dolev-Yao Model (1) The adversary can do the following things: Obtain any message passing through the network. Is a legitimate user of the network and thus
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This note was uploaded on 09/27/2010 for the course CSE 664 taught by Professor Shengzhong during the Spring '10 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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Lec2 - Wrestling between Safeguard and Attack - An example...

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