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Lec4 - Public Key Cryptosystem Sheng Zhong 1 Recall...

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1 Public Key Cryptosystem Sheng Zhong
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2 Recall Definition A public key cryptosystem is (M, C, K, G, E, D): M: cleartext message space C: ciphertext space K: key space G: generate encryption/decryption key pair from key length E: encrypt cleartext given encryption key D: decrypt ciphertext given decryption key
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3 RSA Cryptosystem Most well known and widely used public- key cryptosystem. Named after inventors: Rivest, Shamir, and Adleman. Got Turing award for RSA Based on factoring of large number In fact, more than that.
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4 RSA Key Generation (1) Generate two large random primes p, q p, q are usually of the same length. N=pq Choose appropriate exponent e (of the same length). Compute d such that for all m, ) (mod 1 1 n m ed -
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5 RSA Key Generation (2) Public Key: (n,e) Private Key: (n,d) Discard p,q Very important for security of RSA.
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6 RSA Encryption/Decryption Cleartext space: (an appropriate subset of ) {1, …, n-1} Ciphertext space: (an appropriate subset of ) {1, …, n-1} E((n,e), m)=m e mod n. D((n,d), c)=c d mod n.
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7 Why does the decryption work? m n m n m n m n m n m n m n m n c ed ed ed d e d = = = = = = = - + - mod ) mod ( 1 ) mod ( ) mod ( mod ) ( mod mod ) ( mod 1 1 ) 1 (
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8 Exponentiation Algorithm Both encryption and decryption need to compute modular exponentiation. What algorithm do we use to do this? By definition, a e is multiplication of a for e times. Then even computing something like 754 238 takes a lot of time. How about computing a e for a=2497347974111112432432432243243242 34324234234320043543570 and e=…?
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9 Fast Exponentiation(1) Let’s write e in binary, for example: e=1010000000110 Then Enough if we can fast compute 1 2 10 12 b b b 2 2 2 2 10 100 0 1000000000 000 1000000000 110 1010001000 a a a a a a a a a a b b e = = = 1 2 10 12 2 2 2 2 , , , a a a a
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10 Fast Exponentiation (2) But how can we fast compute Starting from a; Keep squaring, we get Until we have all items we need 1 2 10 12 2 2 2 2 , , , a a a a ,... , , , 4 3 2 1 2 2 2 2 a a a a
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11 Fast Exponentiation Algorithm Input: a, e Output: y=a^e int b=a, y=1, ee=e; while(ee!=0){ //invariant (b^ee) y = a^e if(ee&1){ //is odd y*= b;} //multiply result by power b*=b; ee>>=1;} //compute next power
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12 Computing d? Now we see how encryption/decryption algorithms work. But how does key generation algorithm work? In particular, how to find d? Recall we need for all m, m ed-1 =1(mod n). This requires a little number theory.
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13 Residue Class (1) For any modulus n, any integer a, we can define A={a’: a’=a mod n} This is called a residue class. For any modulus n, the residue classes mod n constitute a partition of integers. Any two residue classes mod n are disjoint. Every integer is in a residue class mod n.
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14 Residue Class (2) Being in the same residue class is called modular equivalent mod n. This is an equivalence relation.
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