IOE437f10+assign+11+headlight

IOE437f10+assign+11+headlight - to reset the aim, just...

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Headlight Aim Assignment University of Michigan fall 2010 Industrial and Operations Engineering 437 Automotive Human Factors © Paul Green Headlight Aim Assignment Background and Expected Learning Objectives 1. to familiarize you with the literature on automotive human factors (course objective) 2. to provide material for discussion 4. to encourage you to read on your own (course objective) What you are to do: To provide context for the lecture on lighting measure the vertical aim (in degrees) of the left and right headlamps of any vehicle (car, bus, truck, tank, combine, road grader, etc.) to which you can get access. The angle of interest (actually its tangent) it distance the headlight is below or above the projected horizontal divided by the distance to the wall. We are not interested in horizontal aim. Unless you so desire, there is no reason
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Unformatted text preview: to reset the aim, just measure it. You may find the notes on pages 6 and 7 of the AAA brochure (Blinded by the light) to be helpful, though it is unlikely you will need to use E=MC^2. Deliverable: Hand in 1 page describing the vehicle measured (year, make, model), how the data were collected, and the vertical angle for the left and right lamp. Include a picture (from a digital camera or phone camera) of the set up. Since the date will be used in class, come to class with the deliverable the day lighting is discussed. References: AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety (undated). How to Handle Glare for Safer Night Driving (brochure), Washington, D.C.: AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Note: Use the original version on the Ctools site, not the current version on the AAA site....
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2010 for the course IOE 437 taught by Professor Green during the Fall '10 term at University of Michigan.

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