SME_8e_Ch_15_Section_1 - 1 CHAPTER 15 SECTION 1:...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 CHAPTER 15 SECTION 1: CHI-SQUARED TESTS MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. To determine whether data were drawn from a multinomial distribution with certain proportions, you use a: a. chi-squared goodness-of-fit test. b. chi-squared test of a contingency table. c. chi-squared test for normality. d. None of these choices. ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 15.1 2. A chi-squared goodness-of-fit test is always conducted as a(n): a. lower-tail test. b. upper-tail test. c. two-tail test. d. All of these choices are true. ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 15.1 3. If each element in a population is classified into one and only one of several categories, the population is: a. normal. b. multinomial. c. chi-squared. d. None of these choices. ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 15.1 4. To determine the critical values in the chi-squared distribution table, you need to know the: a. degrees of freedom. b. sample size. c. probability of Type II error. d. All of these choices are true. ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 15.1 5. Which of the following represents H 1 in a chi-squared goodness-of-fit test to see if all 5 colors of a certain candy appear in the same proportion in the population? a. H 1 : p 1 = p 2 = p 3 = p 4 = p 5 = 0.20. b. H 1 : At least one proportion is not equal to 0.20. c. H 1 : None of these proportions are equal. d. None of these choices. ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 15.1 2 6. Of the values for a chi-squared test statistic listed below, which one is most likely to lead to rejecting the null hypothesis in a goodness-of-fit test? a. b. 0.05 c. 1.96 d. 45 ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 15.1 7. Suppose the value of your chi-squared test statistic in a goodness-of-fit test is equal to 0. What do you conclude? a. Reject H . Conclude that at least one proportion is not equal to its specified value. b. Fail to reject H . Not enough evidence to say the proportions are different from what is listed in H . c. Not enough information; need the degrees of freedom for the test. d. None of these choices. ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 15.1 8. How do you calculate the expected frequency for one cell in a goodness-of-fit test? a. The expected frequency is equal to the proportion specified in H for that cell. b. Use the total number of observations divided by the number of categories. c. Multiply the specified proportion for that cell (found in H ) by the total sample size. d. None of these choices. ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 15.1 9. How does a multinomial distribution differ from a binomial distribution? a. A binomial has only two possible categories and a multinomial can have more. b. A binomial has a fixed number of n trials. A multinomial has a fixed number of nk trials, where k is the number of categories. c. The probabilities in a binomial distribution are always p and 1 - p . The trials in a multinomial distribution are always p/k and (1 - p/k )....
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2010 for the course FINOPMGT 250 taught by Professor Kumar during the Spring '10 term at University of Massachusetts Boston.

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SME_8e_Ch_15_Section_1 - 1 CHAPTER 15 SECTION 1:...

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