9110 Psych - Prosocial behavior: Any act performed with the...

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Prosocial behavior: Any act performed with the goal of benefiting another person. Altruism: Separate concept of prosocial behavior; desire to help another person even if it involves a cost to the helper. Evolution psychologist believes that natural selection favors genes that promote survival of an individual. Yet we’re saying there might be a cost to us. Kin selection: Behaviors that help a genetic relative are favored by natural selection. Reciprocity norm: Expectation that helping others will increase likelihood they will help us in the future. There’s something innate us, where we try to help increase the survival of everyone. Learning social norms; we been highly adaptive to learn social norms of other people from society. Altruism is one of those norms, we’re innately more like to pick up on. Social Exchange: Altruistic behavior based on self-interest. Helping could be rewarded, it feels good for us. It’s a investment in our future. It helps me out in someway. Helping can be costly for us though, physical danger, pain, potential for embarrassment, takes a lot of time. There’s no altruism, its like the social exchange theory. Outcome= rewards minus cost. Social exchange theorist say that. Pure altruism is likely to come into play when we feel empathy, when a person is in need of help. Empathy- ability to put oneself in shoes of another person and experience events
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2010 for the course PSYCH 645321 taught by Professor Frankco during the Summer '10 term at UCSD.

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9110 Psych - Prosocial behavior: Any act performed with the...

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