AP Stylebook Review A-M

AP Stylebook Review A-M - Stylebook Review Stylebook Review...

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Unformatted text preview: Stylebook Review Stylebook Review A­M Commonly Misspelled Words Commonly Misspelled Words Accommodate Acknowledgment Admissible Adviser Advisory All right Amid (not amidst) Amok Afterward Backward Barrel, barreled, barreling bowlegged Boyfriend, girlfriend Broccoli Broadcast (same past tense) Cancel, canceling, canceled, cancellation Cannot Catalog, cataloged, cataloger, cataloging, catalogist Chain saw Changeable, changeover Chauffer Baby­sit, baby­sitting, baby­ sat, baby sitter Commitment Colorblind Citywide Clientele Contagious Coordinate Court­martial, court­martialed, courts­martial Crack up (v.) crackup (n. and adj.) Crossover Cupful, cupfuls Cure­all Air­condition Daughter­in­law, daughters­in­ law (same for father, brother and mother) Defendant Dietitian Dive, dived (not dove), diving Doughnut Drunkenness Enforce Reinforce Exaggerate Fluorescent Forbid, forbade, forbidding Forsake, forsook, forsaken Fundraising, fundraiser Glamour, glamorous Gobbledygook Gray, but greyhound hallelujah Hang, hanged, hung Harass, harassment Hearsay Hemorrhage Hideaway Hodgepodge Impostor Inasmuch as Incur, incurred, incurring Index, indexes Indiscriminate Indispensable Innocuous Innuendo IOU, IOUs Judgment Ketchup Kidnap, kidnapped, kidnapping, kidnapper Kindergarten Knickknack Liaison Limousine Likable Life­size Lifestyle Lifetime Livable Login, logon, logoff, but log in (v.) Medieval Memo, memos Memento, mementos Trademarks Trademarks Should be used only if essential to story Aqua­Lung Band­Aid Bubble Wrap Bufferin Caterpillar Clorox Frigidaire Frisbee Google Kitty Litter Land Rover Jeep Cyclone Coca­Cola, Coke Disposall Dixie cup Dramamine Dr Pepper Excedrin Jacuzzi Jaws of Life Jell­O Jet Ski Kleenex Mace Muzak Accept means to receive Except means to exclude Aid is assistance An aide is a person who serves as an assistant To allude is to speak of without specifically mentioning it To refer is to mention directly An altar is a platform used in a religious service To alter is to change To arbitrate is to hear all evidence and hand down a decision To mediate is to listen to both parties and help bring them to an agreement burglary is entering a building with intention to commit a crime Larceny is the wrongful taking of property Robbery is the use of violence or threat in committing larceny. Theft describes larceny that did not involve threat or violence. Two objects must me in motion in order to collide. To compose means to create or put together Comprise means to contain, include all or embrace Complacent means self­satisfied Complaisant means eager to please You are convinced that something or of something You are persuaded to do something A cynic is a disbeliever A skeptic is a doubter Damage is destruction Damages are awarded by a court as compensation for injury, loss, etc. Differ from means to be unlike Differ with means to disagree Discreet means prudent Discrete means detached, separate. Dyeing refers to changing colors Dying refers to death One who leaves a country emigrates from it. One who comes into a country immigrates. An engine develops its own power. A motor receives power from an outside source. Everyone means each individual Everyone means all persons Farther refers to physical distance Further refers to an extension of time or degree. A felony is a serious crime. A misdemeanor is a minor offense against the law Flack is slang for press agent Flak is a type of anti­aircraft fire To flail is to swing the arms widely To flay is to strip off the skin by whipping Figuratively, to flay means to tongue­lash a person Flair is conspicuous talent Flare is a verb meaning to blaze with sudden, bright light or burst out in anger Flaunt is to make an ostentatious or defiant display Flout is to show contempt for. Flier is the preferred tem for an aviator or a handbill Flyer is the proper name of some trains and buses A flounder is a fish To flounder is to move clumsily or jerkily To founder is to bog down, become disabled or sink. To forego means to go before To forgo means to abstain from To gibe means to taunt or sneer Jibe means to shift direction or to agree Flags are flown at half­mast on sips and at naval stations Ashore, flags are flown at half­staff. A historic event is an important occurrence, one that stands out in history Any occurrence in the past is a historical event Homicide is a legal term for slaying or killing Murder is malicious, premeditated homicide Manslaughter is homicide without malice or premeditation Impassable means that passage is impossible Impassible and impassive describe lack of sensitivity to pain or suffering Writers or speakers imply in the words they choose. A listener or reader infers something from the words In indicates location Into indicates motion It’s is a contraction for it is or it has Its is the possessive form of the pronoun Lowercase jeep is the military vehicle Jeep is the four­wheel­drive civilian vehicle Lay, laid, laying are action words and take direct objects Lie, lay, lain, lying indicate a state of reclining along a horizontal plane. Lie, lied, lying mean to make an untrue statement A speaker stands behind a lectern, on a podium or rostrum, or in the pulpit. Deep South­capitalize when referring to the region that consists of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina Capitalize the days of the week. Do not abbreviate except when needed in tabular form. Always use Arabic figures for dates. Capitalize the names of months in all uses. When a month is used with a specific date, abbreviate only Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov. and Dec. Dean’s list is lowercase in all uses. Definitely is overused as a vague intensifier. Avoid it. Demolish and destroy both mean to do away with something completely. Something cannot be partially demolished or destroyed and it is redundant to say totally demolished or destroyed. Capitalize Depression and the Great Depression when referring to the worldwide economic hard times generally regarded as having begun with the stock market collapse of 1929. Lowercase in other uses. Call children 15 or younger by their first name on second reference. Use judgment for ages 16 and 17 and only last names for those over 18. Avoid kids as a synonym for children. Collective nouns take singular verbs and pronouns: class, committee, crowd, family, group, herd, jury, team. Use figures for dimensions and spell out inches, feet, yards, etc. Hyphenate adjectival forms before nouns. Do not describe an individual as disabled or handicapped unless it is clearly pertinent to a story. The fact that a woman is a divorcee should be mentioned only if a similar story about a man would mention his marital status. Two people look at each other. More than two look at one another. Earth is generally lowercase. Capitalize only when used as the proper name of the planet. Use the word elderly to describe a person only if it is relevant to the story. Capitalize holidays and holy days Hopefully means in a hopeful manner. Don’t use it to mean it is hoped, let us or we hope. Capitalize hurricane when used with its name and use the pronouns it or its rather than he or she when referring to it. Lowercase ice age, but capitalize proper nouns in the names of individual ice ages Use illegal only to mean a violation of the law, not rules Illegal immigrant is preferred rather than illegal alien Use a period and no space when an individual uses initials instead of a first name. Injuries are suffered, not sustained or received. Not guilty is preferable to innocent because it is more precise legally intranet is a private network inside a company or organization. Irregardless is a double negative. Use regardless. The religion is Islam, the followers are Muslims, the holy book is the Quran. ERA is acceptable in all references to baseball’s earned run average and in second reference for Equal Rights Amendment. The preferred term for a person who fights fire is a firefighter. Fiscal year is the 12­month period that a corporation or governmental body uses for book­keeping purposes. Always lowercase first family and first lady, even when used before the name of a chief of state’s wife. Capitalize God in references to the deity of all monotheistic religions. Capitalize all noun references to the deity: God the Father, Holy Ghost, Holy Spirit, etc. Lowercase personal pronouns, as well as gods and goddesses in association with polytheistic religions and false gods. Hyphenate both the noun and adjectival forms of grade, grader: first­grader, 10th­grader, a fourth­grade pupil, a 12th­grade pupil. Capitalize Hades, but lowercase hell. Capitalize the names of widely recognized historical periods and events in anthropology, archaeology, geology and history. Jargon is the special vocabulary and idioms of a particular class or occupational group and in general, it should be avoided. Kudos means credit or praise for an achievement. It is singular and takes singular verbs. Capitalize lake as part of a proper name. Avoid the use of last as a synonym for latest if it might imply finality. Capitalize Last Supper. Avoid the irrelevant use of the word local. LSD is acceptable on all references to the drug Don’t use a hyphen between adverbs ending in –ly and adjectives they modify Mafia is lowercased as a synonym for organized crime and capitalized when referring to the secret society of criminals. Magna Carta, not Magna Charta. Mardi Gras literally means fat Tuesday. Describes a day of merrymaking on the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday Do not put a 12 in front of midnight or noon. Remember… Remember… Don’t use derogatory terms or profanity except in direct quotes, and then only when their use is essential tothe story. Hyphenate words when they answer what type of something Look up rules on datelines, abbreviations and acronyms Capitalize titles when they’re formal ...
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2010 for the course JOU 4368 taught by Professor Burleson during the Spring '10 term at Baylor.

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