Suboptimal Size and Location of Distributed Generation for Maintaining the Protection Coordination

Suboptimal Size and Location of Distributed Generation for Maintaining the Protection Coordination

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1 Abstract -- Distributed Generation (DG) is predicted to play an increasing role in the electric power system of the near future. Such advantages can be achieved if the relevant concerns are deliberately taken into account. Protection scheme for distribution system, primarily consisting of fuses and reclosers and, in some cases, relays, has traditionally been designed assuming the system to be radial. After connecting distributed generation (DG), part of the system may no longer be radial, which means the coordination might not hold. This paper has analyzed and derived a set of equations to represent such protection coordination and operating range constraints. The result can be used to make constraints for the sizes of DG sources while the existing protection scheme can be maintained. Illustration of the proposed approach, will be implemented using DIgSILENT POWER FACTORY 13.1 software on a simple feeder of distribution network Index Terms -- Distribution system, Distributed generation, Protection coordination, Recloser. I. INTRODUCTION istributed generation (DG) is defined as energy sources (ranging in size from few kilowatts to approximately 10 MW)[2] connected to distribution systems. The main advantage of DG units is their close proximity to the load that they serve. The possibility of decentralized operation of independent producers connected directly to distribution systems, reducing costs & environmental aspects reinforce the tendency of generating small blocks of electric power through renewable sources are the main motivations for the increase in interest in Distributed Generation. Besides, several electrical benefits come from the connection of distributed generation to the distribution systems, such as: emergency backup during sustained utility outages; value of energy savings through peak saving during time of use rates and or curtail able periods; reduced voltage sags; increased reliability; potential utility capacity addition deferrals; reduction of electric losses; improves the power factor of feeders with the liberation of service capacity and support the local load during islanding; In the same way that distributed generators bring benefits, Ali farzanehrafat is student of M.Sc in electrical engineering in Azad University of Science and Research, and with Ghods Niroo Consulting Engineers (GNCE) Tehran, Iran (e-mail: [email protected]). S. M. T Bathaee is associated professor of Electrical Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, EE Dept. Seyede Khandan Bridge.Iran (e-mail: [email protected]). they have a potential of significant impact on the system and equipment operation in terms of steady-state operation, dynamic operation, reliability, power quality, stability, protection and safety for both costumer and electricity suppliers. In this paper, the focus will be on the impact of DG on system protection. Traditional electric distribution systems are radial in nature, and are supplied through a main source. These networks have a very simple protection system, and its
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2010 for the course EPS 090229 taught by Professor Nxhviet during the Winter '10 term at Hanoi University of Technology.

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Suboptimal Size and Location of Distributed Generation for Maintaining the Protection Coordination

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