07-linked_lists_2 - CSE143 Lecture7 MoreLinkedLists http/www.cs.washington.edu/143 Conceptualquestions ListNode Whyarethefie

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CSE 143 Lecture 7 More Linked Lists slides created by Marty Stepp http://www.cs.washington.edu/143/
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2 Conceptual questions What is the difference between a  LinkedIntList  and a  ListNode ? What is the difference between an empty list and a  null  list? How do you create each one? Why are the fields of  ListNode  public?  Is this bad style? What effect does this code have on a  LinkedIntList ? ListNode current = front; current = null;
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3 Conceptual answers A list consists of 0 to many node objects. Each node holds a single data element value. null list: LinkedIntList list = null; empty list: LinkedIntList list = new LinkedIntList(); It's okay that the node fields are public, because client code  never directly interacts with  ListNode  objects. The code doesn't change the list. You can change a list only in one of the following two ways: Modify its  front  field value. Modify the  next  reference of a node in the list.
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4 IMPORTANT There are  only  two ways to change the structure of a       linked  list: 1) change the value of  front this changes the starting point of the list example:  front = null; 1) change the value of  <something>.next , where   <something>  is a  temporary variable  that refers to a       node  in the list this changes a link in the list example:  current.next = null;
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5 Implementing  remove // Removes and returns the list's first value. public int remove() {
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2010 for the course CSE 143 taught by Professor Sr during the Spring '08 term at University of Washington.

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07-linked_lists_2 - CSE143 Lecture7 MoreLinkedLists http/www.cs.washington.edu/143 Conceptualquestions ListNode Whyarethefie

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