exam two key - Phil 1110 Exam Two Key 3/30/10 J. Collins...

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Phil 1110 Exam Two Key 3/30/10 J. Collins [1] How did Hume define “miracle”? What factor did Hume think was most important in evaluating testimony in support of miracles? How much confidence did Hume think we should put in miracle testimony? Explain why. What is an objection to Hume’s view that we discussed in class? (30) Hume defined a miracle as a violation of the laws of nature, due to divine intervention. The factor that Hume thought was most important when evaluating miracle testimony is the likelihood of the kind of event testified to . If someone testifies to a very unlikely event, that ought to diminish your confidence in the testimony, because it makes the testimony less likely to be true. Hume thought we should have no confidence in miracle testimony because it was always likelier to be false. After all, it would take a miracle for miracle testimony to be true, but lies and mistakes are commonplace, so it hardly takes a miracle for miracle testimony to be false. So it’s likelier to be false. The objection to this that we discussed is that following Hume’s advice might lead us to dismiss legitimate evidence of things once thought impossible, such as the asexual reproduction of frogs. Given how rare such reproduction was, we might have concluded that it was more likely that the testimony of such events was false, and we’d not have learned something about biology. [2] We discussed two different definitions of free actions, one of them “compatibilist” and the other libertarian. State these definitions. What is one reason to think that the libertarian kind of free will is not compatible with God having perfect foreknowledge? Explain. (20) The compatibilist definition of free will is that an action is free only if the immediate cause of the action is a desire of the agent. So if my arm moves because I want it to move, that’s free, but if it moves because someone shoves it, or I have a spasm, that’s not free. The libertarian definition of free action is that an action is free only if, right at the moment the action is to happen, the agent has
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2010 for the course PHIL 1110 taught by Professor Miller during the Spring '08 term at East Carolina University .

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exam two key - Phil 1110 Exam Two Key 3/30/10 J. Collins...

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