Lecture 3 - Lecture3:Glaucons ChallengeandtheIdealCity...

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Lecture 3: Glaucon’s  Challenge and the Ideal City PHIL 105: Fall 2010 August 30, 2010
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Reminders Bring your iclicker and register it online at iclicker.com Attendance and participation is recorded in both large  lecture and discussion section. Go to our Compass website for syllabus, schedule, etc. I will continue to repeat (until enrollment stabilizes) that I  ask you not to use laptops and other such devices during  large lecture. I was also continue to state (until everyone hears it) that  I have a policy that, if you miss half or over of the  combined lectures and discussions, you fail the course.  In other words, if you are new to the course, then read the  syllabus carefully.
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Previously… We began with the CHALLENGES TO MORAL  REALISM (= morality is REAL) of MORAL SKEPTICISM  and the IMMORALISM, as stated by Thrasymachus. Against the MORALLY SKEPTICAL idea that the rules  and laws of a society are the mere artifacts of the self- interested and arbitrary will of the rulers, Plato argued  that RULERS practice a CRAFT that has as its object  the WELL-BEING of the members of the society. Against the IMMORALIST’S claim that we OUGHT TO  BE UNJUST because it is in our interest to do so and to  ignore JUSTICE, Plato’s BAND OF THEIVES argument  shows that one must be SOMEWHAT JUST in order to  survive/function with others. 
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How ought one to live? (How do you  choose to live your life?) A. One ought to follow the laws of the society in  which one is placed (regardless of what they  are) because they define the just and right way  to live for that society. B. One ought to try do as much evil and unjust  things that one can get away with because  those are good and pleasurable. C. One ought to live according to the true  standards of morality (whatever those may be)  and be a just person. 
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How ought one to think? A. One ought to believe whatever one’s  society tells them to be true and think  along the exact lines of everyone else  and past generations. B. One ought to believe whatever one  wants, whatever suits your self-interest,  regardless of whether it is “true” or not. C. One ought to have the most truthful set of  beliefs and achieve real knowledge  according to universal standards.
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Three Types of “Good” Book II begins with Glaucon taking up Thrasymachus’  position for the sake of argument (he does not really  believe that Thrasymachus is correct). Glaucon makes the following distinction:
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2010 for the course PHIL 105 taught by Professor Ruckgarber during the Fall '10 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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Lecture 3 - Lecture3:Glaucons ChallengeandtheIdealCity...

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