ven2lecc10_(growth)

ven2lecc10_(growth) - VEN 2 Growth of Grapevines Growth of...

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VEN 2 Growth of Grapevines
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Growth of Grapevines Growth is an irreversible increase in size Growth can be measured in various ways Shoots/leaves – increase in length, the number of nodes, leaf area and biomass Fruit – volume, diameter, weight (biomass) Trunk – diameter and weight (biomass) Roots – total number, # of new root produced and weight (biomass) (dry weight is favored over fresh weight since fresh weight can vary on a diurnal basis)
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Source/Sink Relationships Source – is the place where something is synthesized or stored and remobilized Source of carbohydrates – leaves (when present) producing photosynthates or carbohydrate reserves in the roots, trunk, cordons (if any) and spurs or canes. Sink – organ where the source product is utilized Sink for carbohydrates – organs that are growing, organs w/o capability of synthesizing carbohydrates and respiration
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Carbon skeletons for carbohydrates are produced in the Calvin Cycle within the chloroplast. Starch also is synthesized within the chloroplast and can be stored there. Sucrose is produced within the cytoplasm of the cell and from there it is translocated throughout the grapevine.
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Sucrose is produced in the cytoplasm and then is the principal sugar translocated in grapevines.
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Phloem has the ability to transport materials both upwards and down- wards within the plant.
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Carbohydrate reserves from the permanent structures of the vine are utilized at budbreak to support growth of the new developing shoot. The roots, trunks and cordons (if any) are the organs where such reserves are stored. Reserves may also be contained in the spurs and canes.
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The shoots are still dependent upon reserves at this time.
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When shoots are ~ 6 inch in length, they may be self-sufficient (produce enough photosynthate to support their C requirements).
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These shoots are definitely producing enough carbohydrates via photosynthesis to support their growth and maintenance requirements.
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Reserves I have data to indicate that carbohydrate reserves in the roots and trunk (cordons) decrease from leaf fall to budbreak. These reserves also decrease from budbreak up to just prior to anthesis. After anthesis, the carbohydrate reserves
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2010 for the course VEN 81437 taught by Professor Larrywilliams during the Fall '10 term at UC Davis.

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ven2lecc10_(growth) - VEN 2 Growth of Grapevines Growth of...

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