ven2lecc13_(irrlec_mod)

ven2lecc13_(irrlec_mod) - VEN 2 Vineyard Irrigation...

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VEN 2 Vineyard Irrigation
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Irrigation Systems Non-pressurized : water is delivered to the vines by allowing it to run over the surface of the soil, beginning at one end, down between the rows to the other end. Flood/border irrigation – water that is allowed to cover all space between rows. Furrow irrigation – furrows are made in the soil between rows and water flows along the furrows.
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Flood (also called border or basin) irrigation of grapevines in the San Joaquin Valley.
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Furrow Irrigation
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Furrow Irrigation
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Irrigation Systems Pressurized : water is delivered to the vines through some sort of tubing under pressure. Drip or low volume irrigation Overhead sprinkler irrigation
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Drip Irrigation System Plastic tubing (called a lateral line) is placed directly beneath the vines down the row. At regular intervals along the lateral line emitters are inserted into the tubing to allow small amounts of water to be delivered to the vines. Emitters manufactured in the US will have flow rates from 0.5 to 2.0 gallons (2 to 8 liters) per hour. Other components of this type of irrigation system include a pump and a filter. A filter is necessary as very small particles such as sand and algae can clog the emitters. Only a small volume of soil will be wetted using this system, directly beneath the emitter.
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Drip irrigation in young vineyard with two emitters per vine.
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Drip irrigation in a mature vineyard.
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Installing sub-surface, drip irrigation in the San Joaquin Valley.
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Roots of grapevines that were drip irrigated (on left) with the emitter close to the trunk and vines that were furrow irrigated (on right).
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Low volume irrigation, fogger or mister.
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Overhead Irrigation System Tubing (either metal or PVC) is placed down a row (generally at the level of the top of the trellis) and at regular intervals sprinkler heads on top of risers are attached (therefore the sprinkler heads are above the vine’s canopy). The sprinkler heads will have a delivery rate between 25 to 100 gallons of water/hour. The sprinklers will be spaced every 3 to 4 rows apart and 8 to 12 vines down a row, depending upon the radius of water that is sprayed. This system will wet the entire surface of the vineyard. A pump and filter also are required. A grower may use this irrigation system for frost protection in the Spring.
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Overheard sprinkler irrigation in the Salinas Valley.
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Overhead sprinkler irrigation in the San Joaquin Valley
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Irrigation Systems - Advantages Pressurized (drip) : 1.) can be used on flat or hilly surfaces, 2.) can continue with normal cultural operations while irrigating, 3.) can apply fertilizers and pesticides through the drip system, 4.) low labor costs after installation Pressurized (overhead) : 1.) can be used on on non-flat surfaces, 2.) can be used for frost protection Non-pressurized : 1.) cheaper to install than pressurized systems {however the land must be level} 2.) can be used for frost protection.
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Irrigation Systems - Disadvantages Pressurized (drip)
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2010 for the course VEN 81437 taught by Professor Larrywilliams during the Fall '10 term at UC Davis.

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ven2lecc13_(irrlec_mod) - VEN 2 Vineyard Irrigation...

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