ven118lecc16_(vertebratepestssv)

ven118lecc16_(vertebratepestssv) - VEN 118 Vertebrate Pests...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–19. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: VEN 118 Vertebrate Pests 1998 Wildlife Damage to Grapes for CA and the USA Location Total Dollar Value Lost From Wildlife Damage Total Expenditures on Wildlife Damage Prevention California $19,725,000 $4,767,000 Total USA $23,135,000 $5,431,000 1998 Wildlife Damage Study Frequency of Damage in Vineyards by Species Species Percent Reporting Starlings 14.0% Ground Squirrels 9.0% Blackbirds 8.0% Deer 7.5% Coyotes 6.5% 1998 Wildlife Damage Study Frequency of Reported Prevention Methods for Vineyards Method Percent Reporting Fencing 24.0% Flagging 17.5% Pyrotechnics 17.5% Fright Devices 12.0% Repellents 7.0% Control of vertebrate pests: In the past many have only looked at control in an emergency situation Control economic damage already has occurred and the pest population is very large Vertebrate pest management: If you can predict then you can prevent damage Management impose control practices prior to economic damage when pest population is small and/or localized Vertebrate Pests Identification Damage Biology Monitoring Control see next slide Integrated management: Population monitoring (of primary importance) Habitat management Bio-control Exclusion Trapping Chemicals Cultural practices Integrated management: One must also know the legal status of the mammal in question (i.e. whether it is a game on non-game mammal). One must also be aware of the impact of any control practice on endangered species. UC IPM Pest Management Guidelines While vertebrate pests are not listed under grape pest guidelines, one can find the following pests listed under Pests in Landscapes and Gardens Pocket Gopher Voles Rabbits Birds Ground Squirrels Deer Pocket gophers ( Thomomys spp .) ( T. bottae most abundant in CA) Pocket Gopher ( T. bottae ) Range (in Purple) Extreme SW. Oregon through California, S. and E. Nevada, Utah, SW. Colorado, Arizonia and New Mexico Pocket gophers are 17 to 27 cm (6 to 8 in) in length with dark brown to grayish fur. The tail is essentially hairless. They get their name from the fur-lined external cheek pouches or pockets they use for carrying food and nesting materials. They have powerful front quarters Large-clawed front paws Fine short fur that doesnt cake in wet soils Small eyes and small external ears Highly sensitive facial whiskers Lips (can be closed behind the four large incisor teeth to keep dirt out of its mouth) As with all rodents, their incisors grow continuously and require constant gnawing or filing to keep them at a manageable length. Pocket gopher - biology They are fossorial (burrowing) rodents They spend from 95% of their life underground They generally are more active excavating soil in spring and fall They do not hibernate Pocket gophers are solitary, extremely territorial, antisocial and pugnacious. Their tunnels are 2 3 inches in diameter The burrows are 8 12 inches below the...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 09/29/2010 for the course VEN 81437 taught by Professor Larrywilliams during the Fall '10 term at UC Davis.

Page1 / 96

ven118lecc16_(vertebratepestssv) - VEN 118 Vertebrate Pests...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 19. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online