EAS 201 - 4

EAS 201 - 4 - The Science of Natural Disasters Natural...

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The Science of Natural Disasters Natural Disasters , 7th ed., by Patrick L. Abbott (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2009; ISBN-13: 978-0-07-337669-1). Written Assignment 4 1. Many hurricanes form north of the equator in the North Atlantic, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico. Why don't many hurricanes form south of the equator in the South Atlantic Ocean? Many hurricanes form north of the equator in the North Atlantic, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico because formations require ocean temperatures to be 80ºF or 27ºC (in the upper 60m), 5° distance of the equator or 300 miles with a pre- existing low-pressure system. Hurricanes not only need water temperature and low-pressure systems, they need space. Large shallow areas, able to reach temperatures of 80ºF, like those found in: the South China Sea, the Caribbean Sea, the seas around Australia and the northern Indian Ocean. Large shallow seas with land or islands in close proximity. In the south Atlantic along Brazil, the ocean is too narrow without enough shallow water, between the coast of South America and the coast of Africa the Ocean is deep, cold and in full force. These seas rarely reach temperatures of 80ºF and if they do, they rarely stay at those temperatures long enough to form a hurricane. The shallow warmth of the water provides the fuel for the system. Evaporation from the warmth of the water allows water vapor to form, condensing into cloud systems, releasing latent heat and thus creating a hurricane.
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a. Can a hurricane form at the equator? No, North and South of the equator the Coriolis effect is zero within 5º. Coriolis stems from the equator being the most protruded point on Earth, receiving the most solar heat from the sun. The Coriolis effect repels wind and water, setting the stage and motion for the rotation of our weather systems and current to the oceans. Deflecting the moving bodies to the right in the northern hemisphere and to the left in the southern hemisphere. The absence of Coriolis produces a constant sea breeze, with very little low-pressure systems. At the other latitudes, the Coriolis force is responsible for producing the large-scale land breeze. “At 20°N, the slower rotation of the horizontal wind after sunset produces a
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2010 for the course NETW 204 taught by Professor Kosseifi during the Summer '13 term at Conestoga.

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EAS 201 - 4 - The Science of Natural Disasters Natural...

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