ENS 314 - Final Exam - ENS-314 Global Environmental Change...

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ENS-314 Global Environmental Change Living in the Environment: Concepts, Connections, and Solutions , 16th ed., by G. Tyler Miller, Jr., and Scott E. Spoolman (Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole CENGAGE Learning, 2009). FINAL PROJECT Climate Change Prepared by Student at Thomas Edison State College Assignment Distributed Prepared for Global Environmental Change (ENS-314) Thomas Edison State College
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Technical summary of climate change Overwhelming scientific study demonstrate the earth’s atmosphere is warming rapidly, mostly because of human activities, and that this will lead to significant climate change during this century (Miller, Spoolman 2010). Climate change throughout history has affected evolution and natural selection, moving continents and dispersing populations throughout the world with these movements. Until the industrialization of the human population a hundred and sixty years ago our atmosphere maintained a unique combination of chemicals. Absorbing the natural emissions from volcanic action and the life cycle, balancing the chemical composition providing a life sustaining biome. The atmosphere provides both life and protection to the ecosystems on the planet from the sun’s UV rays and a variety of debris from space. The atmosphere acts as a blanket working in a layering system to earth. Divided into five layers, the thickest is closest to the surface and thins outward toward space. The stratosphere, the second layer from earth, deflects ultraviolet rays emitted from the sun. Our atmosphere is composed of : (NOAA 2010) (excluding water vapor) 99% of the air you inhaled consists of two gases : Nitrogen (N2) 780,840 ppmv (78.084%) and Oxygen (O2) 209,460 ppmv (20.946%) Argon (Ar) 9,340 ppmv (0.9340%) Carbon dioxide (CO2) – 390 ppmv (0.039%) - 93% of the CO2 in the atmosphere is the result of the natural carbon cycle. the remainder of which is from human activity.
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Neon (Ne) 18.18 ppmv (0.001818%) Helium (He) 5.24 ppmv (0.000524%) Methane (CH4) 1.79 ppmv (0.000179%) Krypton (Kr) 1.14 ppmv (0.000114%) Hydrogen (H2) 0.55 ppmv (0.000055%) Carbon monoxide (CO) 0.1 ppmv (0.00001%) Major contributors are motor vehicle exhaust, burning of forests and grasslands, tobacco smoke, open fires and inefficient stoves used for cooking. Xenon (Xe) 0.09 ppmv (9 × 10−6%) Ozone (O3) 0.0 to 0.07 ppmv (0% to 7 × 10−6%) – human activities is credited with decreasing the amount of beneficial ozone in the stratosphere, increasing the amount of harmful ozone in the troposphere near ground level. Nitrous oxide (N2O) 0.3 ppmv (0.00003%) and Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) 0.02 ppmv (2 × 10−6%) Excess due to human activity, emitted from fertilizers and burning fossil fuels results in photochemical smog. Iodine (I) 0.01 ppmv (1 × 10−6%)
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ENS 314 - Final Exam - ENS-314 Global Environmental Change...

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