EE302(16045-16055) Course Descriptor (Fall 2010)-4

EE302(16045-16055) Course Descriptor (Fall 2010)-4 - EE302...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 EE302: INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Fall 2010 Course: EE302. Unique # 16045, 16050 and 16055. Fall 2010. Time: Lecture: MWF 2:00 – 3:00 in ENS 127 Lab for 16045: T 9:00 – 11:00 in ACA 1.108 Lab for 16050: Th 9:00 – 11:00 in ACA 1.108 Lab for 16055: M 11:00 – 1:00 in ACA 1.108 Instructor: Dr. G. L. Cardwell [email protected] Office Hours: MWF 9:30 – 11:00 AM ENS 421 Course Website: http://courses.utexas.edu/ Prerequisites: An appropriate score on the ALEKS placement examination, or Mathematics 305G with a grade of at least C-. Required Text: Circuits, First Edition by Ulaby & Maharbiz.. The textbook is bundled with a National Instruments myDAQ and sold as a unit by the UT Austin ECE Department. Teaching Assistants: Seunghyun Chun (Head TA) [email protected] Milo Holt [email protected] Manzur Rahman [email protected] Nandita Raman [email protected] Brice Sorrels [email protected] Shitong Zhao [email protected] TA Office Hours: To Be Announced ENS 139 Course Objectives and Learner Outcomes EE 302 is broken into two main components. The first component focuses on the analysis of DC linear circuits. In this course, you will cover each of the following topics: Representation of Analog Circuit Quantities Definitions of various analog circuit elements such as resistors, voltage sources, and dependent sources. Kirchoff's Current and Voltage Laws Advanced circuit analysis techniques such as node voltage and mesh current analysis Development of Thévenin and Norton equivalent circuits for analyzing circuits Using models for advanced electronic devices including diodes, transistors, and op-amps. These topics are addressed in the lectures and in the homework assignments. The second component is a survey of important aspects for the Professional Engineer. In this course, you will cover each of the following topics: Different focus areas in electrical and computer engineering Problem solving and the Engineering Design Process Ethical behavior of engineers Responsibilities of the engineer to society Intellectual property. These topics are addressed primarily by the Explore Engineering Project that you will complete throughout the semester. You will also have weekly lab assignments designed to reinforce your knowledge of these topics and are an integral component of EE302. The laboratory problems have been designed to encourage you to take advantage of computer applications and other tools available in the laboratory. Although this is not a programming course, you will develop both expertise and confidence in using computers to solve technical problems. Prior Knowledge Expectations Students who are in EE302 are expected to have completed or be enrolled in their first semester of calculus. As a result, students are expected to have all of the following on the first day of class: Proficiency in elementary algebra; linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions; polynomials; systems of linear equations; and applications Familiarity with the following concepts: charge, current, voltage, work, energy, and power.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2 Reading Assignments Reading assignments for each lecture are noted on the schedule found below and on the class website. You are expected to
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern