Chemistry titration of acids and bases

Chemistry titration of acids and bases - Experiment 7...

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Experiment 7 Titration of Acids and Bases By Andrew Klingsporn CHEM 211: General Chemistry I Lab Section 3 October 29, 2008 Laboratory Instructor: Dr Chandana Meegoda
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Purpose The purpose of this experiment is to become familiar with the techniques of titration, a volumetric method of analysis; to determine the amount of an acid in an unknown. Introduction One of the most common and familiar reactions in chemistry is the reaction of an acid with a base. This reaction is termed neutralization , and the essential feature of this process in an aqueous solution is the combination of hydronium atoms with hydroxide atoms to form water. H 3 O - (aq) + OH - (aq) 2H 2 O (l) In this experiment, we will be using this reaction to determine the concentration of a sodium hydroxide solution by the method of standardization. Next, we will accurately measure the amount of our standard base used to neutralize the acid in the unknown. To do this, phenolphthalein is added. Phenolphthalein is a clear indicator solution we will add to the acid. When it becomes pink, the acid has become alkaline with a pH of approximately 9. We will be titrating a NaOH solution against a pure sample of potassium hydrogen phthalate, KHC 8 H 4 O 4 of known weight. Potassium hydrogen phthalate (often abbreviated as KHP) has only one acidic hydrogen. The balanced equation for the neutralization of KHP is: KHC 8 H 4 O 4(aq) + NaOH (aq) H 2 O + KNaC 8 H 4 O 4(aq)
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Chemistry titration of acids and bases - Experiment 7...

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