Diode - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Diode Wikipedia, - Diode From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia Jump to navigation search Figure 1 Closeup of the image below showing the square

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 Diode From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation , search Figure 1: Closeup of the image below, showing the square shaped semiconductor crystal Figure 2: Various semiconductor diodes. Bottom: A bridge rectifier
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Figure 3: Structure of a vacuum tube diode In electronics , a diode is a two-terminal device ( thermionic diodes may also have one or two ancillary terminals for a heater ). Diodes have two active electrodes between which the signal of interest may flow, and most are used for their unidirectional electric current property. The varicap diode is used as an electrically adjustable capacitor . The directionality of current flow most diodes exhibit is sometimes generically called the rectifying property. The most common function of a diode is to allow an electric current to pass in one direction (called the forward biased condition) and to block it in the opposite direction (the reverse biased condition). Thus, the diode can be thought of as an electronic version of a check valve . Real diodes do not display such a perfect on-off directionality but have a more complex non-linear electrical characteristic, which depends on the particular type of diode technology. Diodes also have many other functions in which they are not designed to operate in this on-off manner. Early diodes included “cat’s whisker” crystals and vacuum tube devices (also called thermionic valves ). Today the most common diodes are made from semiconductor materials such as silicon or germanium .
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Contents 1 History 1 . 1 P r i n c i p l e s 1 . 2 R a d i o r e c e i v e r s 2 Thermi onic and gaseous state diodes 3 Semico nductor diodes 3 .
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[ edit ] History Although the crystal diode was popularized before the thermionic diode, thermionic and solid state diodes were developed in parallel. The principle of operation of thermionic diodes was discovered by Frederick Guthrie in 1873. [1] The principle of operation of crystal diodes was discovered in 1874 by the German scientist, Karl Ferdinand Braun . [2] At the time of their invention, such devices were known as rectifiers . In 1919, William Henry Eccles coined the term diode from Greek roots ; di means "two", and ode (from odos ) means "path". [ edit ] Principles Thermionic diode principles were rediscovered by Thomas Edison on February 13 , 1880 and he was awarded a patent in 1883 ( U.S. Patent 307,031 ), but developed the idea no further. Braun patented the crystal rectifier in 1899 [1] . Braun's discovery was further developed by Jagdish Chandra Bose into a useful device for radio detection. [ edit ] Radio receivers The first radio receiver using a crystal diode was built around 1900 by Greenleaf Whittier Pickard . The first thermionic diode was patented in Britain by John Ambrose Fleming (scientific adviser to the Marconi Company and former Edison employee [2] ) on November 16 , 1904 ( U.S. Patent 803,684 in November 1905). Pickard received a patent for a silicon crystal detector on
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2010 for the course GENERAL AR ECE 250 taught by Professor Drcapps during the Spring '10 term at N.C. State.

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Diode Wikipedia, - Diode From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia Jump to navigation search Figure 1 Closeup of the image below showing the square

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