Flip-flop (electronics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Flip-flop (electronics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia...

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 Flip-flop (electronics) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation , search This article is about the electronic component. For other meanings, see flip-flop (disambiguation) . In digital circuits , a flip-flop is an onomatopoeic term referring to an electronic circuit (a bistable multivibrator ) that has two stable states and thereby is capable of serving as one bit of memory . Today, the term flip-flop has come to mostly denote non-transparent ( clocked or edge-triggered ) devices, while the simpler transparent ones are often referred to as latches ; however, as this distinction is quite new, the two words are sometimes used interchangeably (see history). A flip-flop is usually controlled by one or two control signals and/or a gate or clock signal . The output often includes the complement as well as the normal output. As flip-flops are implemented electronically, they require power and ground connections.
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Contents 1 History 2 Implem entatio n 3 Set- Reset flip- flops (SR flip- flops) 4 Toggle flip- flops (T flip- flops) 5 JK flip- flop 6 D flip- flop 7 Master- slave D flip- flop 7 . 1 E d g e - t r i g g e r e d D
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[ edit ] History The first electronic flip-flop was invented in 1919 by William Eccles and F. W. Jordan . [1] It was initially called the Eccles-Jordan trigger circuit, and consisted of two active elements (radio-tubes). The name flip- flop was later derived from the sound produced on a speaker connected with one of the back coupled amplifiers output during the trigger process within the circuit. This original electronic flip-flop—a simple two-input bistable circuit without any dedicated clock (or even gate) signal, was transparent , and thus a device that would be labeled as a "latch" in many circles today. [ edit ] Implementation Flip-flops can be either simple (transparent) or clocked. Simple flip-flops can be built by cross-coupling two inverting elements – transistors , NAND gates, or NOR gates – perhaps augmented by some enable/disable (gating) mechanism. Clocked devices are specially designed for synchronous (time-discrete) systems and therefore one such device ignores its inputs except at the transition of a dedicated clock signal (known as clocking, pulsing, or strobing). This causes the flip-flop to either change or retain its output signal based upon the values of the input signals at the transition. Some flip-flops change output on the rising edge of the clock, others on the falling edge . Clocked (non-transparent) flip-flops are typically implemented as master-slave devices [2] where two basic flip-flops (plus some additional logic) collaborate to make it insensitive to spikes and noise between the short clock transitions; they nevertheless also often include asynchronous clear or set inputs which may be used to change the current output independent of the clock. Flip-flops can be further divided into types that have found common applicability in both
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Flip-flop (electronics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia...

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