mazher laghri - Marketing Models: Reflections and...

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Marketing Models: Reflections and Predictions Jehoshua ELIASHBERG (*) Garv L. LILIEN (**) (*) University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, U.S.A. The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, U.S.A.
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Marketing Models: Reflections and Predictions* Jehoshua Eliashberg University of Pennsylvania and Gary L. Lilien Penn State University Abstract We show that the past several decades have seen explosive growth in the development and dissemination of marketing models. While developments have not matched all the field's early goals, achievements in the marketing models area have been dramatic. We provide a personal perspective on past accomplishments in the field and outline nine areas we anticipate will see some exciting development in the next few years. * Portions of this paper are adapted from Eliashberg and Lilien (1993).
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I. Introduction When the term marketing comes to mind, many people think of "pet rocks," cans of "New York City air," and the cyclical movement of hemlines in women's fashions; the analysis of the demand for such items seems well removed from the reliance on so-called "marketing models." Indeed, many company executives despair of putting marketing on a more scientific basis. Many see marketing processes as lacking the neat quantitative properties found in production and finance. In marketing, human factors play a large role, marketing expenditures affect demand and cost simultaneously and information to support truly systematic decisions is rarely available. Further, the effects of most marketing actions are typically delayed, nonlinear, stochastic and difficult to measure. Yet, marketing model developments have been profound and substantial. A major force behind these developments is the battle for markets that has been dictating organizational success and failure in recent years. Sales in many markets are flat or declining while competitors have been growing in number and becoming more desperate. Products are exhibiting shorter life cycles and leaner staff organizations have become buried in oceans of new types of data (from bar code scanners and other sources), demanding rapid comprehension and sound decision making in dynamic and risky environments. In this paper we reflect on the development, evolution and future of the marketing models field. We will show substantial developments, trends and what we feel are exciting areas for future development in the sections to follow. 11. Categorizing Marketing Models The marketing models literature began to emerge in a significant way in the 1960s. following the successful application of mathematical models to the areas of production, operations and logistics during and immediately following World War II. At that time, several authors provided some classification schemes that were useful in trying to organize the growing literature on marketing models.
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2010 for the course RDS 26 taught by Professor Musharaftalpur during the Winter '07 term at University of Karachi.

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mazher laghri - Marketing Models: Reflections and...

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