ch1_3 - Sep. 3, 2010 (Friday) Chapter 1: Regular Languages...

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Unformatted text preview: Sep. 3, 2010 (Friday) Chapter 1: Regular Languages Example 3 Design a finite automaton M 3 which recognizes the following language L 3 = { x over { 0,1 } | x does not end with 01, and contains substring 10 } Solution One for Example 3 step 1: We remember the following information What are the last two symbols that we just read? Have we seen substring 10? step 2: A total of 14 states since 7 possible answers to the first question and 2 possible answers to the second question. 10 valid states : (00, yes), (01, yes), (10, yes), (11, yes), (00, no), (01, no), (11, no) , (0, no), (1, no), ( , no) 4 invalid states : (10, no), (0, yes), (1, yes), ( , yes) The start state is state ( , no). The final states are states (00, yes), (10, yes), and (11, yes). step 3: Since we have a large number of states, we use a table to show the transitions, instead of using the state transition diagram. The first state is the start state, and * is used to indicate a final state.indicate a final state....
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This note was uploaded on 09/30/2010 for the course CSE 434sd taught by Professor Csczdxc during the Spring '10 term at Harding.

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ch1_3 - Sep. 3, 2010 (Friday) Chapter 1: Regular Languages...

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