ch4 - ©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering 7th...

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Unformatted text preview: ©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 4 Slide 1 Software Processes ©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 4 Slide 2 Objectives ● To introduce software process models ● To describe three generic process models and when they may be used ● To describe outline process models for requirements engineering, software development, testing and evolution ● To explain the Rational Unified Process model ● To introduce CASE technology to support software process activities ©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 4 Slide 3 Topics covered ● Software process models ● Process iteration ● Process activities ● The Rational Unified Process ● Computer-aided software engineering ©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 4 Slide 4 The software process ● A structured set of activities required to develop a software system • Specification; • Design; • Validation; • Evolution. ● A software process model is an abstract representation of a process. It presents a description of a process from some particular perspective. ©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 4 Slide 5 Generic software process models ● The waterfall model • Separate and distinct phases of specification and development. ● Evolutionary development • Specification, development and validation are interleaved. ● Component-based software engineering • The system is assembled from existing components. ● There are many variants of these models e.g. formal development where a waterfall-like process is used but the specification is a formal specification that is refined through several stages to an implementable design. ©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 4 Slide 6 Waterfall model ©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 4 Slide 7 Waterfall model phases ● Requirements analysis and definition ● System and software design ● Implementation and unit testing ● Integration and system testing ● Operation and maintenance ● The main drawback of the waterfall model is the difficulty of accommodating change after the process is underway. One phase has to be complete before moving onto the next phase. ©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 4 Slide 8 Waterfall model problems ● Inflexible partitioning of the project into distinct stages makes it difficult to respond to changing customer requirements. ● Therefore, this model is only appropriate when the requirements are well-understood and changes will be fairly limited during the design process. ● Few business systems have stable requirements....
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This note was uploaded on 10/01/2010 for the course CS 1292 taught by Professor Aabdollah during the Spring '10 term at NJ City.

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ch4 - ©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering 7th...

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