3.42 - 3.4. Fal l acies of P resumption, Ambiguity, and Gr...

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3.4. Fallacies of Presumption, Ambiguity, and Grammatical Analogy 2 Fallacies of Ambiguity - The premises or conclusion (or both) of an argument that commits this sort of fallacy admits multiple, distinct interpretations in a single context. (This is what `ambiguity' means: to admit distinct interpretations in a single context.) 1. Equivocation 2. Amphiboly 1. Equivocation - fallacious. - An arguer commits the fallacy of equivocation when the conclusion of her argument follows from the premises of her argument only if some expression (word or phrase) occurring in the argument is used in more than one sense. - Examples: 1. Communist plots are worrisome. Lenin's grave is a communist plot. Therefore, Lenin's grave is worrisome. 2. Any law can be repealed by legislative authority. The law of gravity is a law. So the law of gravity can be repealed by legislative authority. 3. A mouse is an animal. Hence, a large mouse is a large animal. -
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3.42 - 3.4. Fal l acies of P resumption, Ambiguity, and Gr...

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