pt53 - December 2007 - PrepTest 53 LSAT Better Scores....

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LSAT * December 2007 - PrepTest 53 *LSAT is the registered trademark of the Law School Admission Council, Inc. Copyright © 2008 by Princeton Review, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Better Scores. Better Schools.
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A complete version of December 2007 LSAT has been reproduced with the permission of Law School Admission Council, Inc. All actual LSAT questions printed within this work are used with the permission of Law School Admission Council, Inc., Box 2000, Newtown, PA 18940, the copyright owner. LSAC does not review or endorse speciFc test preparation materials or services, and inclusion of licensed LSAT questions within this work does not imply the review or endorse- ment of Law School Admission Council, Inc. LSAT is a registered trademark of Law School Admission Council, Inc.
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SECTION I Time—35 minutes 25 Questions Directions: The questions in this section are based on the reasoning contained in brief statements or passages. For some questions, more than one of the choices could conceivably answer the question. However, you are to choose the best answer; that is, the response that most accurately and completely answers the question. You should not make assumptions that are by commonsense standards implausible, superfluous, or incompatible with the passage. After you have chosen the best answer, blacken the corresponding space on your answer sheet. 1. Consumer advocate: Businesses are typically motivated primarily by the desire to make as great a profit as possible, and advertising helps businesses to achieve this goal. But it is clear that the motive of maximizing profits does not impel businesses to present accurate information in their advertisements. It follows that consumers should be skeptical of the claims made in advertisements. Each of the following, if true, would strengthen the consumer advocate’s argument EXCEPT: (A) Businesses know that they can usually maximize their profits by using inaccurate information in their advertisements. (B) Businesses have often included inaccurate information in their advertisements. (C) Many consumers have a cynical attitude toward advertising. (D) Those who create advertisements are less concerned with the accuracy than with the creativity of advertisements. (E) The laws regulating truth in advertising are not applicable to many of the most common forms of inaccurate advertising. 2. Elaine: The purpose of art museums is to preserve artworks and make them available to the public. Museums, therefore, should seek to acquire and display the best examples of artworks from each artistic period and genre, even if some of these works are not recognized by experts as masterpieces. Frederick: Art museums ought to devote their limited resources to acquiring the works of recognized masters in order to ensure the preservation of the greatest artworks.
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This note was uploaded on 10/02/2010 for the course ACCT 5457 taught by Professor Polm during the Fall '10 term at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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pt53 - December 2007 - PrepTest 53 LSAT Better Scores....

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