Wireless Network Standards

Wireless Network Standards - Wireless Network Standards 1...

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Wireless Network Standards 1 Wireless Network Standards Collin Williams Axia College of University of Phoenix IT/241 Allyson Heisey September 30, 2010
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Wireless Network Standards 2 Introduced shortly after 802.11’s debut in 1997, 802.11b provided a standard for wireless networks to connect via radio waves with a maximum bandwidth of 11 Mbps, up from the 2 Mbps of 802.11. These radio frequencies fall into the ISM band, a frequency range of license- free radio transmissions. Wireless devices based on this standard can communicate with other devices at a maximum range of 375 feet, though as the devices get further apart the bandwidth is lessened to compensate for decreased transmission strength. Operating in the U-NII unlicensed frequency range, 802.11a allows up to 54 Mbps bandwidth. The cost of developing wireless devices for 802.11a is higher than 802.11b because CMOS semiconductors cannot be used. The semiconductors used in 802.11a devices must be made from gallium arsenide or silicon germanium. Though the bandwidth is higher for an 802.11a network,
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This note was uploaded on 10/02/2010 for the course IT 241 taught by Professor L.nichols during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Wireless Network Standards - Wireless Network Standards 1...

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