The existential quality - known as the rain dance, was used...

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The existential quality is a tradition in American Indian songs. It was a belief that songs were tangible. Songs were their most valuable personal possessions. Songs could be given away, passed along or maybe even stolen by someone. If songs were written down or recorded, they were considered stolen. Their songs concentrated on spiritual and naturalistic elements which created a magical essence. The American Indians used their songs to heal the sick, to provide rain for a bountiful harvest, and to aid them in warfare. Examples that have the existential quality are the Pigeon’s Dream Song by Louis Pigeon and the Butterfly Dance. Pigeon’s Dream Song was specifically used to heal the sick. The Butterfly Dance, otherwise
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Unformatted text preview: known as the rain dance, was used for agriculture; they believed it brought rain to their crops. American Indian songs include Vocables, which are simple vocal sounds. They are not made up at the spot when the songs are sung; they belong to that specific song. The beginning of the song, Rabbit Dance by the Los Angeles Northern Singers, has vocables, as well as the song, Butterfly Dance. Acculturation is a change in a culture through contact with another culture. The use of English in the Native American song, Rabbit Dance, is an example of acculturation. The American Indians were clearly influenced by the American Settlers. Feeling...
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This note was uploaded on 10/03/2010 for the course ARCH Arch 101 taught by Professor Edwardhoe during the Spring '10 term at 카이스트, 한국과학기술원.

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