Global E-Government, 2002 - Global E-Government, 2002 by...

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Global E-Government, 2002 by Darrell M. West 67 George St. Center for Public Policy Brown University Providence, Rhode Island 02912-1977 United States Darrell_West@brown.edu www.InsidePolitics.org September, 2002
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2 Table of Contents Executive Summary A Note on Methodology Overview of Global E-Government Online Information Services Provided Services by Top Nations Privacy and Security Security by Top Nations Privacy by Top Nations Disability Access Foreign Language Access Ads, User Fees, and Premium Fees Restricted Areas Public Outreach Email Responsiveness Top E-Government Countries Differences by Region of World Conclusions Appendix Table A-1 E-Government Rankings by Country, 2002 Table A-2 E-Government Country Ratings, 2001 and 2002 Table A-3 Individual Country Profiles for Services, Privacy, Security, and Disability Access, 2002 Table A-4 Individual Country Profiles for Foreign Language Translation, and Ads, 2002 Table A-5 Best Practices of Top Government Sites, 2002
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3 Executive Summary This report presents the second annual update on global e-government, i.e., the delivery of public sector information and online services through the Internet. Many governmental units across the world have embraced the digital revolution and placed a wide range of materials on the web from publications to databases. Since global e-government still is in its infancy, it is a perfect time to measure the extent of web service delivery, compare differences that exist across nations, and see how the 2002 results compare to 2001. In this report, we study the features that are available online at national government websites. Using a detailed analysis of 1,197 government websites in 198 different nations, we measure the information and services that are online, chart the variations that exist across countries, and discuss how e-government sites vary by region of the world. In general, we found that e-government has shown improvements over the previous year. Every region of the world has improved its e-government performance on nearly every indicator. However, there are continuing problems in the areas of privacy and security that need to be addressed. We close our report by making several practical suggestions for improving the delivery of government information and services over the Internet. Among the more important findings of the research are: 1) 12 percent of government websites offered services that are fully executable online, up from 8 percent in 2001 2) the most frequent services are ordering publications, making travel reservations, searching and applying for jobs, applying for passports, and renewing vehicle licenses 3) 77 percent of websites provide access to publications and 83 percent have links to databases (the latter being up from 41 percent in 2001) 4) 14 percent of government websites feature a one-stop services "portal" or have links to a government portal 5) 14 percent (up from 6 percent in 2001) show privacy policies, while 9 percent (up from 3 percent in
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This note was uploaded on 10/03/2010 for the course CSE 1234 taught by Professor Cho during the Spring '10 term at Bangladesh University of Eng and Tech.

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Global E-Government, 2002 - Global E-Government, 2002 by...

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