Chapter 03 - CHEMISTRY The Molecular Science Chapter Three...

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CHEMISTRY The Molecular Science Chapter Three Chemical Compounds
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Compounds combination of two or more elements molecular and ionic compounds interaction between atoms is called a chemical bond. Formulas: H 2 O water, H 2 O 2 hydrogen peroxide, show the type and the number of atoms of each element present. If the subscript changes – it is a different compound with different chemical and physical properties. molecular formulas for molecular compounds. empirical formulas for ionic compounds.
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Inorganic Chemistry The field of chemistry in which the chemical reactions and properties of all the chemical elements and their compounds are studied, with the exception of the hydrocarbons. Inorganic Compounds do not contain C or C and H HCl, NaCl, NaOH, MgF 2
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Organic Chemistry The branch of chemistry in which carbon compounds and their reactions are studied. Organic Compounds Compounds containing at least one carbon-hydrogen bond. CH 4 , CH 4 O, C 6 H 6 The majority of organic compounds are molecules. They contain C, usually H, and may contain O, N, S, P, or halogens (F, Cl, Br, I).
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Models of Ethanol A chemical bond is represented by a line. A structural formula shows how the atoms are connected. A condensed formula shows how the atoms or groups are connected to each carbon atom: CH 3 CH 2 OH.
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Exercise 3.1 p. 81 A model of propylene glycol, used in some “environmentally friendly” antifreezes, looks like this: Write the structural formula, the condensed formula, and the molecular formula for propylene glycol.
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Naming Binary Molecular Compounds Binary compounds are composed of two elements. For hydrogen compounds containing O, S, and the halogens, the hydrogen is written first in the formula and named first. The other nonmetal is then named, with the nonmetal’s name changed to end in – ide. chlorine chloride fluorine fluoride sulfur sulfide HCl hydrogen chloride HF hydrogen fluoride H 2 S hydrogen sulfide
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For compounds composed of two non-metallic elements (Groups 3A-8A), the more metallic element (towards the lower left side of PT) is listed and named first. Greek prefixes are used to designate the number of a particular kind of atom: mono 1 penta 5 di 2 hexa 6 tri 3 hepta 7 tetra 4 octa 8
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Common Compounds CO carbon monoxide CS 2 carbon disulfide SO 3 sulfur trioxide CCl 4 carbon tetrachloride PCl 5 phosphorus pentachloride SF 6 sulfur hexafluoride
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Practice Problem 3.2 p. 83 Name these compounds: a) SO 2 b) BF 3 c) CCl 4 Exercise 3.2 p. 83 Give the formula for each of these binary nonmetal compounds: c) sulfur dibromide e) oxygen difluoride f) xenon trioxide
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