Lecture 3 - 2010-2-18

Lecture 3 - 2010-2-18 - 2/18/2010 What We Will Cover...

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2/18/2010 1 What We Will Cover Hacking Identity Theft and Credit Card Fraud Scams and Forgery Crime Fighting Versus Privacy and Civil Liberties Laws That Rule the Web Hacking Hacking currently defined as to gain illegal or unauthorized access to a file, computer, or network The term has changed over time Phase 1: early 1960s to 1970s It was a positive term A "hacker" was a creative programmer who wrote elegant or clever code A "hack" was an especially clever piece of code Hacking (cont.) Phase 2: 1970s to mid 1990s Hacking took on negative connotations Breaking into computers for which the hacker does not have authorized access Still primarily individuals Includes the spreading of computer worms and viruses and ‘phone phreaking’ Companies began using hackers to analyze and improve security
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2/18/2010 2 Hacking (cont.) Phase 3: beginning with the mid 1990s The growth of the Web changed hacking; viruses and worms could be spread rapidly Political hacking (Hacktivism) surfaced Denial-of-service (DoS) attacks used to shut down Web sites Large scale theft of personal and financial information Hacking (cont.) Hacktivism, or Political Hacking: Use of hacking to promote a political cause Disagreement about whether it is a form of civil disobedience and how (whether) it should be punished Some use the appearance of hacktivism to hide other criminal activities How do you determine whether something is hacktivism or simple vandalism? Hacking (cont.) The Law: Catching and Punishing Hackers: 1986 Congress passed the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) Covers government computers, financial and medical systems, and activities that involve computers in more than one state, including computers connected to the Internet The USA Patriot Act expanded the definition of loss to include the cost of responding to an attack, assessing damage and restoring systems
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2/18/2010 3 Hacking (cont.) The Law: Catching and Punishing Hackers (cont.): A variety of methods for catching hackers Law enforcement agents read hacker newsletters and participate in chat rooms undercover They can often track a handle by looking through newsgroup archives Security professionals set up ‘honey pots’ which are Web sites that attract hackers, to record and study Computer forensics is used to retrieve evidence from computers Hacking (cont.) The Law: Catching and Punishing Hackers (cont.): Penalties for young hackers
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This note was uploaded on 10/03/2010 for the course ESE 337 taught by Professor Chi-tsongchen during the Spring '10 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Lecture 3 - 2010-2-18 - 2/18/2010 What We Will Cover...

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