Word Sorting

Word Sorting - Word Sorting In this activity, students...

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Word Sorting In this activity, students compare, contrast and sort words according to specific features (Henderson, 1990; Templeton & Bear, 1992; Zutell, 1996). Word sorting allows students to form hypotheses, concepts and generalizations about the properties of written words, and it will help them link new words to he familiar ones they can already read and spell. There are two basic types of word sort activities. 1. In closed sorts, students are asked to find a specified feature in a group of words. For example, students can find words that have a “silent e ” (e.g., make, cute, pile) or another other phoneme. In closed sorts, children are being asked to engage in deductive thinking. 2. In open sorts, students classify words according to shared features that they discover themselves. For example, students can find words that have an –ed and learn that some of those words have a consonant that is doubled before eh –ed. In open sorts, children are asked to engage in inductive thinking. For children at all levels, it is important to talk about the words as they sort them because
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Word Sorting - Word Sorting In this activity, students...

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