Chapter 1 - Biochem 314/414 Introductory Biochemistry...

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Unformatted text preview: Biochem 314/414 Introductory Biochemistry Instructor: Stephen Starnes Office: 339 Science Lab: 329 Science E-mail: stephen_starnes@tamu-commerce.edu Phone: (903) 886-5389 Use tools to memorize Histidine? Study in groups What is Biochemistry? Biochemistry = The study of molecules and the chemical reactions of life. The principles and language of chemistry used to explain biology at the molecular level. Basic principles of biochemistry are common to all living organism such as bacteria, plants and animals. How does biochemistry impact you? Medicine Agriculture Industrial applications Environmental applications Principle Areas of Biochemistry Structure and function of biological macromolecules Metabolism anabolic and catabolic processes. Molecular Genetics How life is replicated. Regulation of protein synthesis Life Before Biochemistry Vitalism: a doctrine that the processes of life are not explicable by the laws of physics and chemistry alone and that life is in some part self-determining. Evidence: 1) Only living things have a high degree of complexity 2) Only living things extract, transform and utilize energy from their environment 3) Only living things are capable of self assembly and self replication J n s Jakob Berzelius, one of the early 19th century "fathers" of modern chemistry, though he rejected mystical explanations of vitalism, nevertheless argued that a regulative force must exist within living matter to maintain its functions. The basic premise was that organic materials differed from inorganic materials fundamentally; accordingly, vitalist chemists predicted that organic materials could not be synthesized from inorganic components. Origins of Biochemistry: A challenge to Vitalism. Pioneers in Biochemistry Friedrich W hler (1800-1882) Eduard Buchner (1860-1917) Emil Fisher (1852-1919) Fallacy #1: Biochemicals can only be produced...
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Chapter 1 - Biochem 314/414 Introductory Biochemistry...

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