Revised_essays_(4_in_total) - Death and Remembrance...

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Death and Remembrance Remember by Christina Rossetti and The Cross of Snow by Henry Longfellow are both well crafted poems that address on the prospects of death and remembrance. Rossetti mourns the idea of death and decay and seems to view the process as something comfortable. She encourages remembrance and the memory that remains. In contrast, Longfellow expresses his disdain and fear towards death and unpredictability. The authors were able to employ varying literary techniques of repetition, diction, tone, and symbolism in order to explore the grieving process. Longfellow’s Italian sonnet primarily uses metaphor to mourn his wife, who tragically died from an accident. He compares his wife who has a “gentle face” to a “martyrdom” as though she has sacrificed her life to renounce a religion. This is to convey her selflessness before she died. On the other hand, Rossetti’s Petrarchan sonnet in iambic pentameter uses repetition and anaphora to emphasize the limitless boundary between life and death. She repeats the phrase “remember me” to underline her fear that her beloved will not remember her when he can “no more hold her by the hand.” Her struggle between life and afterlife and her inability to grasp the concept of death and decay is illustrated through her repetition of “gone far away.” She emphasizes the fleeting nature of life and her helplessness and inability to take any action to change the fact. Rossetti’s use of symbol informs the reader that her inability to accept death is underscored by her loneliness rather than fear itself. Her going away to the “silent land” is a symbol of death. Similarly, Longfellow’s utilization of metaphor emphasizes his reluctant nature to let go of his wife. His pure love and affection towards his wife is highlighted when he describes her as “a soul more white” and “a life more benedight.” He compares the cross to death and describes the “halo of pale light” that the night- lamp casts conveys a feeling of hopelessness. Here, he uses allusion to refer to cross that Jesus died on. The cross of snow displayed upon the mountain in the distant west casts the mood of desolation and his unwillingness to let go of this love. Diction is undoubtedly one the central literary devices employed by Longfellow that not only adds to the overall impact of the plot, but has also heightened the mood and set the conflict of the theme. Longfellow utilizes words such as “long” and “sleepless” to illustrate how this death has jeopardized his life and his sanity. He described that his life has seemed to go by slower after the death of his beloved wife. The fact that through all the changing scenes and seasons for the past eighteen years has been “changed” since the day she died demonstrates that nothing is the same without her. Life seems pointless and the seasons blend together as if he’ll never have the ability to experience love this strong again. Conversely, Rossetti’s asks the man to “forget and smile” rather than “remember and be sad.” She compares the process of

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