Chapter-2-Biological_Psychology

Chapter-2-Biological_Psychology - IntroductoryPsychology

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Click to edit Master subtitle style  10/4/10 Introductory Psychology
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 10/4/10 Validity Information produced by research or testing  accurately measures the psychological variable or  quality it is intended to measure
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 10/4/10 Reliability Consistency or dependability of behavioral data  resulting from psychological testing or  experimental research A reliable result is one that will be repeated under  similar conditions of testing at different times
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 10/4/10 Reliability True score: real score on the variable Measurement error
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 10/4/10
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 10/4/10 Interrater reliability Split-half reliability Types of reliability
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 10/4/10 Ethical issues Informed consent Risk/ gain assessment Intentional deception Debriefing
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 10/4/10 http://www.learner.org/resources/series138.html?pop=yes&pid=1528 
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 10/4/10 What is Biological  Biopsychology;   Physiological Psychology;   Psychobiology;  Behavioral  Neuroscience In essence, the discipline  that studies the complex  interaction between behavior  and the body.
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 10/4/10 Genes and Behavior “Nature vs. Nurture” is NOT  debated by Scientists. We are the result of our genes  acting in our environment. Development depends on  interaction between genes and 
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 10/4/10 Genes and Behavior Would Einstein have been a genius if he were  profoundly malnourished while an infant? Will a patient with Down’s Syndrome achieve at  the level of Einstein even with perfect nutrition and  an enriched environment?
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 10/4/10 Genes and Behavior Genes do not  encode behavior,  characters, talents Genes encode  proteins!  
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 10/4/10 Mendelian Genetics Gregor Mendel   described the  pattern of  inheritance of  physical traits
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 10/4/10 Mendelian Genetics DNA Double helix 2 strands Gene Segment of the DNA Recipee for a protein Chromosomes Strings of genes
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 10/4/10 Mendelian Genetics Transcription: RNA is made as complementary  piece of the DNA Translation: RNA transforms its information  into amino acids/ peptides   DNA   RNA  → p rotein
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 10/4/10 Mendelian Genetics Humans have 46  chromosomes, 23 pairs (one  set from mother, one from  father) Autosomes: 22 similar pairs Sex chromosomes: not 
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 10/4/10 Mendelian Genetics Allele: a version of a  gene Genotype Phenotype Homozygous: 2  copies of the same  allele
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 10/4/10 Holism vs. Localization Holism: every area of the brain is capable of  controlling all human functions
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 10/4/10 Holism vs. Localization Localization human functions are  regulated by distinct, specific areas of the  brain Franz Gall: 
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 10/4/10 Brain and personality Phineas Gage
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Chapter-2-Biological_Psychology - IntroductoryPsychology

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