GEOL150_week5_lecture3_DroughtsFloods

GEOL150_week5_lecture3_DroughtsFloods - Week 5 lecture 3...

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GEOl50: Climate Change University of Southern California, Los Angeles Week 5, lecture 3 Droughts and Floods http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/res/div/ocp/drought/
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The Seasonal Cycle of precipitation
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Floods Flood Damage at Cedar rapids, Iowa, June 2008
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Precipitation Extremes
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Precipitation Extremes It seems to never rain the right amount
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Precipitation Extremes It seems to never rain the right amount Too much: foods
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Precipitation Extremes It seems to never rain the right amount Too much: foods Too little: droughts
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Precipitation Extremes It seems to never rain the right amount Too much: foods Too little: droughts Floods are usually fast phenomena
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Precipitation Extremes It seems to never rain the right amount Too much: foods Too little: droughts Floods are usually fast phenomena CF “fash foods”. Associated with weather events
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Precipitation Extremes It seems to never rain the right amount Too much: foods Too little: droughts Floods are usually fast phenomena CF “fash foods”. Associated with weather events Droughts are nefarious because they can last for years, or even decades
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Precipitation Extremes It seems to never rain the right amount Too much: foods Too little: droughts Floods are usually fast phenomena CF “fash foods”. Associated with weather events Droughts are nefarious because they can last for years, or even decades This is climate For sure
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Precipitation Extremes It seems to never rain the right amount Too much: foods Too little: droughts Floods are usually fast phenomena CF “fash foods”. Associated with weather events Droughts are nefarious because they can last for years, or even decades This is climate For sure Today let ʼ s focus on the US droughts
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Photo: ‘Migrant mother, California 1936’, Dorothea Lange " And then the dispossessed were drawn west- from Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico; from Nevada and Arkansas, families, tribes, dusted out, tractored out. Car-loads, caravans, homeless and hungry; twenty thousand and Fy thousand and a hundred thousand and two hundred thousand. ey streamed over the mountains, hungry and restless - restless as ants, scurrying to Fnd work to do - to li, to push, to pull, to pick, to cut - anything, any burden to bear, for food. e kids are hungry. We got no place to live. Like ants scurrying for work, for food, and most of all for land.” John Steinbeck, e Grapes of Wrath , 1939. The Dust Bowl : 1932-1939
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The Dust Bowl drought of the 1930s During the 1930s, at the heart of the Great Depression, one of the greatest population movements in United States history occurred. About 300,000 rural people from the Great Plains headed west to seek land and work in California. They had been driven out by a harsh combination of social, economic and climate forces. A chronic drought had settled on the area, which persisted for a decade with only brief spells of normal rain. The drought-prone wheat that the farmers had planted shriveled and died. Ploughs had torn out the native, drought resistant, prairie grass in the preceding years of ample rain and food demand. Winds tore at the bare soil removing
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This note was uploaded on 10/04/2010 for the course GEOL 150Lxg taught by Professor Stott during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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GEOL150_week5_lecture3_DroughtsFloods - Week 5 lecture 3...

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