Ch.12 - Wide Area Networks

Ch.12 - Wide Area Networks - Information Technology in...

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4/8/2010 1 Information Technology in Theory By Pelin Aksoy and Laura DeNardis CHAPTER 12 WIDE AREA NETWORKS Objectives 2 ± Understand the concept of a wide area network ± Identify the main technical components of a wide area network ± Distinguish between packet switching and circuit switching ± Understand virtual private networks (VPNs) CIS 3003 Information Technology in Theory
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4/8/2010 2 Objectives (continued) 3 ± Gain familiarity with the most important commercial WAN services ± Understand WAN access technologies, including dedicated lines, xDSL, cable modem access, and WiMAX ± Identify important network management functions CIS 3003 Information Technology in Theory WAN Background 4 ± Industry convention describes a WAN as a network that spans a large geographical distance ± The largest example of a WAN is the public Internet, but many other types of WANs exist ± Wide area networking is sometimes referred to as enterprise networking CIS 3003 Information Technology in Theory
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4/8/2010 3 WAN Background (continued) 5 ± Wide area networking developed from the way businesses first used computer networks to exchange businesses first used computer networks to exchange information internally, beginning in the mid-1970s ± Several architectural features distinguished these networks from modern WANs ± WANs now support voice, data, and multimedia information; use open network protocols; and often CIS 3003 Information Technology in Theory information; use open network protocols; and often are offered over a public network such as the Internet Packet Switching 6 ± Information sent over the Internet is broken into small segments called packets ± Each packet contains the actual information content to be transmitted, as well as the order of the packet, the sender’s binary address (called the source address), and the binary address of the CIS 3003 Information Technology in Theory packet’s destination (called the destination address)
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4/8/2010 4 Packet Switching (continued) 7 ± The path that one packet traverses over a network from source to destination may be different from the from source to destination may be different from the next packet’s path, depending on network congestion or other conditions ± In this type of networking approach, known as connectionless packet switching , no dedicated end- to end physical connection is established for the CIS 3003 Information Technology in Theory to-end physical connection is established for the duration of data transmission Packet Switching (continued) 8 ± Network devices called routers read the destination address and determine how to expeditiously route address and determine how to expeditiously route packets through the networks, based on routing algorithms that are designed to minimize latency ± Routers are also designed to minimize hops , the number of times a packet traverses various routers as it is transmitted over a network CIS 3003 Information Technology in Theory ± Once all the packets from a given transmission reach their destination, they are reassembled in correct order
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Ch.12 - Wide Area Networks - Information Technology in...

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