2antignotes_2

2antignotes_2 - Commentary on Antigone Many critics of the...

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Commentary on Antigone Many critics of the tragedy Antigone see its significance as lying in the opposition of Creon and Antigone and all that this opposition represents. At the core of this interpretation lies the fact that Creon has taken a decision, which is disobeyed or questioned by Antigone. The philosopher Hegel, for instance, interprets this as a contest between the law of the state and that of the family. Others see it as the struggle between the central power of the state and the law of individual conscience. It is my contention that these interpretations overlook the tragic aspect of the play. The term “tragic” does not involve a conflict between positions in opposition to one another, in which one position could be determined as decidedly wrong and the other right. Rather the tragic and tragedy revolve around an inherent undecidability or indeterminacy with regard to opposite values such as honor and dishonor. In other words, tragedy and the tragic implicate one in the chiasmic unity of opposite values. It is the chiasmic unity of opposite values, in the play of honor and dishonor, of the “wicked” (Polyneices) and the “just” (Eteocles), that Antigone embodies. She derives this
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This note was uploaded on 10/05/2010 for the course MAP 421 taught by Professor 19ct during the Spring '10 term at NYU.

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2antignotes_2 - Commentary on Antigone Many critics of the...

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