FL_10-8 - Settler resource management in New England - outline

FL_10-8 - Settler resource management in New England - outline

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Lecture 8 – Settler resource management in New England - outline Blackboard Today : 1) CBS horticulture 2) Myth 3) Corn mother myth 4) Settler agriculture: ecology, socioeconomic organization Corn-bean-squash horticulture History Agroecology Polyculture ecosystem structure ecosystem function Shifting agriculture fallowing mimics natural cycles soil and nutrient retention Human needs nutrition 1
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food security subsistence production Social organization gender-based division of labor technology production and reproduction Culture : Human relationship with nature Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) 2
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Myth Myths are symbolic tales concerning the origin and nature of the universe or key elements of culture (e.g.: food, medicine, ceremonies, etc.). Myths serve as ‘charters for social action,’ in that they reflect and rationalize social order, norms, and values by connecting them with universal truths. Myths reflect worldviews - beliefs about the identity and role of the self or
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This note was uploaded on 10/05/2010 for the course ESPM 28984 taught by Professor Spreyer during the Fall '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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FL_10-8 - Settler resource management in New England - outline

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